Changing the mindset on how we view human interconnection

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JamesN.
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Post by JamesN. » Sun May 26, 2013 7:13 pm

" Towards changing a Social Mindset "

Here is an aspect of something I think may be worth exploring that has long range social implications towards individual behavior and mindset with lifelong social impact; and that is " aggressive violent behavior ".

With all the violence so prevalent in society as witnessed in the news media it might be useful to address one of it's causes. As children grow into adults a concern that seems to becoming an increasing problem is that of " Bullying ". One of the strategies used to address this which is " Conflict Resolution " has been seen as very effective. But it might also be good to examine this issue from another direction.

As you watch these brief video clips from a movie called " The War "; notice how the display of aggression and resolution that is played out illustrates what might be described as a ( normal ) instinctive reaction to this scenario so often promoted through mass media storylines; namely physical struggle resulting in a kind of implied ( moral " one-upmanship " ). But look deeper and consider what is driving the behavior that instigated this situation in the first place. Not just possible factors like poverty or hatred and resentment; but ask: " What causes that? "

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymB97QqJu1k

In this second short clip notice the difference in " point-of-view " that is offered as a transcendentive insight.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNG_ZjJsN9g

( Does this reaction come from his compassion; the unconditional love and concern for his children; his understanding; or is it a combination? )


Not to oversimplify this problem but certainly some of the violence that is witnessed all around us comes from conditions similar to the ones just seen. Not only certain economic and social factors but possible political or religious aspects as well.. And it would stand to reason much of the anger, resentment, and fear that is passed on through these conditions may also breed some of the hatred and violent behavior that recycles and increases itself even more. And in addition it might also be worth including the parental and psychological components of this overall mechanism as well.

But two of the themes that Joseph Campbell addresses as: " Love Your Enemies "; and " You and the Other Are One "; ( I think intersect here). And this insight of a " common human condition " I think is a " transparent to transcendent " message we must try to address towards integrating it into our children's consciousness. Not only the idea of resolving the conflict of bulling with conflict agreement or by " forced acceptance "; but treating the " roots of the condition " that cause the problem with psychological and emotional understanding as well. Because if you can change the mindset; then you can begin to change the behavior. :idea:

I'm certainly not saying that this approach is not in some ways being implemented or ( in itself ) would stop all the violence; but I think these themes that Joseph Campbell mentions may be a hint towards something in the way of understanding these kinds of problems.

----------------------------

No doubt there have been many studies that have been conducted focusing on various areas of this problem. I came across this article I listed from the link below that provides an interesting window into one facet that may also have some relevance:

http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2 ... -disorder/
Bullies More Likely to Have Mental Disorder
By John M. Grohol, Psy.D.

If you ever wondered if there was something wrong with bullies and those who engage in bullying behaviors, researchers now have some better idea.

It could be a component of a mental disorder, according to a study out of Brown University and presented today at the American Academy of Pediatrics annual meeting.

After analyzing responses from a parent survey, the researchers found that those who were considered bullies were more than twice as likely to experience depression, anxiety and attention deficit disorder (ADD or ADHD).

Bullying is a problem in many schools. But we need to realize that bullying isn’t always just plain ‘ole bad behavior. Sometimes there are other factors at play.


Because of the survey nature of the study, the researchers couldn’t say whether the mental health problems might be a contributing causal factor of bullying, or whether such disorders are a result of someone who engages in bullying behavior.

All too often, society focuses on the victim of bullying. Little help may be offered to the bully, who may also be suffering from concerns that could benefit from treatment (or at the very least, parental attention):

Some experts agreed, adding that it is also important for parents, clinicians and teachers to identify the root of the children’s anger, and to help the children channel their aggression in a better way.

“Parents of bullies who are made aware of their child’s behavior should take the concerns seriously and seek help and treatment for their child, hopefully in the earlier stages so that alternative behaviors can be taught and reinforced before some of the more negative ones become entrenched,” said Hilfer.

Previous research has found that both bullies and their victims suffer from suicidal thoughts more than 3 times as often as other children.

Bullying and being bullied also has been found in a 2007 study to result in a greater risk of adult mental disorders. The disorders suffered tended to be either an anxiety disorder or antisocial personality disorder.

Over the summer, we also noted a new tool to help profile school bullies. This tool could allow schools to help better identify potential bullies and help them before they turn in to actual bullies.

Bullying is never an excusable behavior. Studies like this help shed light on the complicated dynamics at play with this behavior, and offers parents and professionals ideas on how to help reduce it.
Last edited by JamesN. on Mon Jun 03, 2013 5:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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CarmelaBear
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Post by CarmelaBear » Thu May 30, 2013 1:26 pm

Watched a TV program about a girl in Pakistan who was stigmatized for reporting being gang raped. After all the court and media proceedings, both sides each want the other side dead. The girl is earnestly pleading for the death penalty for four men, and both her brother and father have been killed.

No right. No wrong. Just blood-thirsty rage.

The death penalty for rape? Sheesh.

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JamesN.
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Post by JamesN. » Fri May 31, 2013 2:45 pm

CarmelaBear wrote:Watched a TV program about a girl in Pakistan who was stigmatized for reporting being gang raped. After all the court and media proceedings, both sides each want the other side dead. The girl is earnestly pleading for the death penalty for four men, and both her brother and father have been killed.

No right. No wrong. Just blood-thirsty rage.

The death penalty for rape? Sheesh.

~
Hey Carmela.

This is exactly part of the problem I think when looking at the larger picture of ( cultural and religious bias ) spread cross the global landscape. And one of the figures who most exemplifies this struggle is " Malala Yousafazi ". This young lady represents for many one of the defining issues of human rights; and the use of " education " employed as a tool to help break and overcome the stranglehold of ignorance that is the cause of much of this tragic violent and inhuman suffering.

I might also add that part of what I was trying to address in the above clips was the issue of looking past the " mechanism " of the violent behavior to the " fuel " that is it's source. And I think that this issue you have raised comes from a similar source as well. ( It is not the " act " itself; but what " drives " the emotion behind it. ) :idea:
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JamesN.
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Post by JamesN. » Mon Jun 03, 2013 5:38 pm

This press release from President Obama looks like a positive effort towards changing public perception about the stigma of " Mental Illness ". 8)

http://news.yahoo.com/obama-calls-end-m ... 25213.html
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JamesN.
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Post by JamesN. » Sun Jun 16, 2013 6:04 pm

I have been spending a fair amount of time off and on over the last few years pursuing some of the processes of technological engagement. And as a somewhat older adult I have been seeing more and more the desire for " connection " between human beings increase. Here is an interesting article I think that mirrors both some of the positive and negative aspects that these technologies are pointing towards. ( Some of the feedback was curious as well. ) :idea:


http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/advisor/ ... 13701.html
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CarmelaBear
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Post by CarmelaBear » Wed Jun 26, 2013 11:05 pm

I am concerned about those who are being excluded.

~
JamesN.
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Post by JamesN. » Thu Jun 27, 2013 2:27 am

CarmelaBear wrote:I am concerned about those who are being excluded.

~
From the article:
4. Technology has created a new ‘excluded’

Finally, these young adults believe that technology has widened the gap between rich and poor, with only those in Latin America thinking that it has made the gap smaller. Technology – education and devices – is seen as critical to success and so a lack of access to these is seen as a hindrance. Brands need be aware that whilst for many (if not most) of young adults there is an increasing role for and reliance on technology, there will continue to be an excluded group that they need to engage with too.
Indeed Carmela this IMHO is creating a problem on several fronts. (1.) The economical area just mentioned. (2.) The constant evolution of technical change at ever faster rates, the learning curve involved in adapting and implementing it with the existing technologies. (3.) The ever increasing dependence on these services it provides and it's effects both good and negative.

For instance if you look at the impact ( social media ) had on the " Arab Spring " movement that's a good thing in essence. But if you look at the widening divide between rich or medium income levels who can afford this technology and the poor who cannot, or the technically challenged who have a difficult time implementing this technology; ( who benefits? ) Again here in this case IMO: " A rising tide does indeed lift all boats "

From much of what I have been hearing the trends in the market place are changing pretty rapidly. Globally much of this is due to the rising emphasis towards ( mobile ) communication and interaction like ( Smart Phones and Tablets ) with less emphasis on desktops and laptops.( Apple ipads and iphones competing with Samsung - Android ( app ) Smartphones are a perfect example here. )

Private company internet ( data storage ) as opposed to personal hard drives is another fast moving area of development that the big companies like Google, Microsoft, and Apple are encouraging and coordinating with their services for which they will charge. ( All of the software and services they are starting to offer are subtly steering customers in this direction. ) And what this is really pointing towards is control and money. ( They offer smooth interface, services, and a rewarding customer experience for which they will acquire even more business from their future interactive product developments as their market share increases. )

For instance if Google becomes your internet (browser ) and you use ( Android ) devices who utilizes their format; and channeled through their services they can squeeze out a competitor like Apple or Microsoft and you wind up using their version of the " Cloud " storage service. Amazon competes with Barnes and Noble both selling books; but one can squeeze out the other. ( This happened today as B&N will be discontinuing their tablet called " The Nook " which is used as a reading device to encourage book sales. ) If you own a device and it is discontinued what do you do if you need customer service for it? Also if a format or medium is replaced or outdated by a newer one do you start all over again?

In the larger " scheme of things " one might say people are encouraged to interact and read more and competition improves the marketplace for the consumer. But if one examines more closely the culture or society becomes more dependent on this medium of ingesting information and the cross-breeding of services provided like say digital music, software, internet service or Smart Phones and so on. ( You can begin to see the pattern developing here. ) This is a long way from land-line telephones, cassette tapes, stereo phonograph record players, and antenna televisions which were the previous versions of this technology.

My main point I'm trying to make in all of this is that for all the promoted benefits; ( and there are some important benefits to be sure ); there are also some serious negatives to be considered as well. There are most definitely people who will be marginalized and excluded in various ways and must be taken into account if ( all ) are to be impacted towards a greater " societal good " in this sense. And as the global change that accompanies this technology moves ever forward; ( like a hungry child ); we cannot simply ignore the presence of it's need.
Last edited by JamesN. on Thu Jun 27, 2013 2:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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CarmelaBear
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Post by CarmelaBear » Thu Jun 27, 2013 6:38 am

James, your thoughtful analysis helped me to sort out two particular types of exclusion that are especially important.

A large number are financially excluded from ownership and control of exceedingly crucial forms of communication technology.

In addition, there are a significant number who are either without the training or without the emotional resources to access tech that is otherwise available.

Safety is of special concern to me.

~
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Post by JamesN. » Fri Jun 28, 2013 1:23 am

Here is a fascinating discussion that took place last week at the: " Next Big Thing " technology summit at Half Moon Bay, CA. It's all about some of what I just mentioned and where much of this technology is heading. :idea:

http://www.bloomberg.com/video/gregoire ... KmQKw.html
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CarmelaBear
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Post by CarmelaBear » Sat Jun 29, 2013 9:53 am

When Michael Douglas played the rich Wall Street guy on the big screen, he was one of a very few who could afford the early brick-like cell phones. Now, people like me who earn a pittance (between jobs) can afford a smart phone comparable to the power of the one used by the president.

The technology and the mass market for phones made the technology more powerful and cheaper and easier to use.

This has not happened in the area of human interaction more generally. We are currently attracted like magnets to the richest and most powerful people in the world, instead of claiming our own individual power to save ourselves and our global habitat.

Perhaps to access calm energy and eschew inappropriate violence, we have to sacrifice. Maybe we must give up feel-great fictional violence and otherwise informative news programs. The 99% is unable to access calm energy without large doses of fat, sugar and salt, without large doses of news that leads with the bleed, without large doses of ever-increasing fictional violence.

We can't get energy from supporting the 1%. We need to BOYCOTT THE ONE PERCENT IN THREE EASY STEPS.

1. Consume only news that is clinically accurate, democratically thorough and operates like Wikipedia......Peer-to-Peer. How about WikiNews?

2. Boycott ALL fictional violence, from TV cop shows to games and books and movies.

3. Eat for peace. Frequent smaller portions of fresh local fruits and vegetables, fish and fowl for the meat-eaters, and plenty of salsa. Easy on the artificial intoxicants. Enjoy every bite and savor every meal. Living well is the best revenge.

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JamesN.
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Post by JamesN. » Sat Jun 29, 2013 3:12 pm

Carmela said:
When Michael Douglas played the rich Wall Street guy on the big screen, he was one of a very few who could afford the early brick-like cell phones. Now, people like me who earn a pittance (between jobs) can afford a smart phone comparable to the power of the one used by the president.

The technology and the mass market for phones made the technology more powerful and cheaper and easier to use.

Here is another article from Forbes that takes this subject even further:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/gregsatell/ ... r=yahootix


Carmela said:
This has not happened in the area of human interaction more generally.

To this I would add " human inter-connection " as part of the equation; and yes I think here is where ( part ) of the challenge ahead may lie. But in the larger scope of the picture I believe environment-related issues may play an even bigger role in shaping quality of life. To quote a phrase Joseph Campbell used: " like standing on a whale fishing for minnows! " :roll:

Relatively speaking as for what course I myself should take I think that striving to be more " mindful " and aware in all I that do is good; to be part of the change that I am seeking; to concentrate on working out my own problems instead of fixing others; ( and as much as I am able ) " to reach out to participate joyfully in the sorrows of the world " by doing what one can; and just to be grateful and open to the wonder of being alive. ( Oh yes; and to laugh a little each day is good too. :lol: )
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Post by CarmelaBear » Sat Jun 29, 2013 3:28 pm

JamesN. wrote:
Relatively speaking as for what course I myself should take I think that striving to be more " mindful " and aware in all I that do is good; to be part of the change that I am seeking; to concentrate on working out my own problems instead of fixing others; ( and as much as I am able ) " to reach out to participate joyfully in the sorrows of the world " by doing what one can; and just to be grateful and open to the wonder of being alive. ( Oh yes; and to laugh a little each day is good too. :lol: ) [/i]
Me like. Try, I will.

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Post by JamesN. » Sat Jul 27, 2013 11:34 pm

I came across this article that I think perfectly frames for some a particular paradigm about adapting to the new realities of today's changing societal work environments. It concerns how one finds their direction when the world around them collapses and there is no usual roadmap or model to look to for guidance or navigation. Joseph Campbell's themes I think are precisely matched to this type of dilemma; especially in relation to Carl Jung's understanding not only of a personal myth; but the way in which myth serves in it's various functions to help an individual find meaning, stability, and a connection to both the inner and outer worlds of their existence as well as their means of survival. :idea:

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/unemploye ... 14522.html
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Post by CarmelaBear » Sun Jul 28, 2013 8:53 pm

The earliest religions asserted man's superiority over and command of nature, animals and the human body. Without such strong convictions, hunting, gathering and agriculture would have been impossible.

Today's religion claims that when we are confronted with provocative and violent conduct, we are not only capable of, but required to avoid reacting in kind. When societies succeed in regulating human conduct to minimize internal conflict, the consequences of control bleed into individual lives as well as into our collective or sanctioned interactions with the outside world.

Although one may not resort to putsical violence in a conflict or competition, a sharp tongue can provoke violent responses from those who are required to prove themselves through a capacity for violence.
Last edited by CarmelaBear on Mon Jul 29, 2013 3:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
JamesN.
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Post by JamesN. » Sun Jul 28, 2013 10:32 pm

Hey Carmela.

I'm a little confused with what you are saying concerning the adaptation and re-evaluation strategies connected to work loss of the aging and the dilemma of a changing societal model related in the article:

I said:
I came across this article that I think perfectly frames for some a particular paradigm about adapting to the new realities of today's changing societal work environments. It concerns how one finds their direction when the world around them collapses and there is no usual roadmap or model to look to for guidance or navigation. Joseph Campbell's themes I think are precisely matched to this type of dilemma; especially in relation to Carl Jung's understanding not only of a personal myth; but the way in which myth serves in it's various functions to help an individual find meaning, stability, and a connection to both the inner and outer worlds of their existence as well as their means of survival. Idea

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/unemploye ... 14522.html
I understand the part about earlier societal concepts of survival and the feeling of loss of control found in modern society; but I'm having trouble with the rest. Can you clarify this a little more? :?
What do I know? - Michael de Montaigne
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