Art, what is it?

Discussion of Joseph Campbell's work with an emphasis on the personal creative impulse as well as the sociological role of the artist in today's global community.

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Post by Poncho » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

On 2005-03-23 15:52, Martin_Weyers quoted ivor orr:

[...] and some German egghead with a big paint brush [...]
There is no big paint brush, Ivor!

You mean that you've had it removed? OMG! :eek: Martin! You poor fellow.

Then ... but ... how do you ... well, you know ... "do it"?


On 2005-03-21 14:38, ivor orr wrote:

It's good to have some serious comments on this thread again. As you've probably already worked out, I'm one of the more fluffy-headed members. Sadly, I have no artistic capabilities. But you'll find that there are some very clever people, who occasionally contribute to this thread. That's why I drop my own comments in every so often. It brings the thread up to the top of the forum again so that the real artists (e.g. a very talented young lady from Canada ...) ...

She may, in fact, enjoy this book, reviewed in today's Daily Mail:

The Best Way You Know How by Christine Pountney (Faber, £10.99)

AGED 25, Hannah Crowe leaves her native Canada and heads for London on a mission to improve herself and find a husband.This second ambition is declared in jest, but less than a year later she’s married. So far, so Jane Austen, except that Hannah and Daniel’s romance is a thoroughly modern affair, born of a tipsy night spent together having met at a Brit Art exhibition, their eyes locking across Damien Hirst’s pickled shark. Our heroine is a bolter by nature, and although her intended’s confidence (or is it arrogance?) is intense enough to smother those hobo instincts, it’s not long before their happily-ever-after begins to fray. This is a frank love story, and while it tends towards the pretentious whenever a character opens his or her mouth, its subtle observations on love in a selfish climate have the sting of truth.

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Post by Psyche » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

Perhaps art is also the creation of our lives, complete with our senses.

This showed up in my inbox today and I was not quite sure where else to place it.

True or fictionally invented, this is an interesting shift of paradigm of value.


THE SEVEN WONDERS OF THE WORLD



A group of students were asked to list what they thought were the present

"Seven Wonders of the World." Though there were some disagreements,
the following received the most votes:


1. Egypt's Great Pyramids
2. Taj Mahal
3. Grand Canyon
4. Panama Canal
5. Empire State Building
6. St. Peter's Basilica
7. China's Great Wall

While gathering the votes, the teacher noted that one student had not finished her paper yet. So she asked the girl if she was having trouble with her list. The girl replied, "Yes, a little. I couldn't quite make up my mind because there were so many."

The teacher said, "Well, tell us what you have, and maybe we can help.

"The girl hesitated, then read, "I think the 'Seven Wonders of the World' are:


1. To See
2. To Hear
3. To Touch
4. To Taste
5. To Feel
6. To Laugh
7. And to Love."
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Post by Psyche » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

Hi Martin, Hi Ivor:

There is no big paint brush, Ivor!

You mean that you've had it removed? OMG! :eek: Martin! You poor fellow.
Hey...what about Jackson Pollock??? :eek:


Or Damien Hurst???? :eek: :eek:

She may, in fact, enjoy this book, reviewed in today's Daily Mail:


Indeed...I particularly like the inclusion of the pickled shark. erg. :smile: I checked out the link you provided...high praise indeed for this writer! The literary trailer and highlighted reviews are quite full of reverence!

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Post by Painted Owl » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am





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Post by Poncho » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

There's a new series just started on BBC2 this evening. Click HERE.

You'll see that if you then click on "Art and Personality" you can take part in an online experiment to see whether your personality influences the type of art that you like.

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Post by Vissi » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

It's art but is it anatomy?Michelangelo Code

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Post by Mark ONeil » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

Wow, Ivor orr, I always took for granted that there was no question that your personality influences what kind of art you like -- seems like something they wouldn't have to study. You know, though, maybe we like what we like because we have been told to like it. I mean, how many artists were we exposed to in High School that we found we no longer liked in College? Steinbeck is a great example -- we read him in High School and then in College some prof. tells us that his style is wobbly and that art should not have social purpose and -- BAM!-- now we like Donald Barthelme or Joyce or Thomas Pynchon instead, though if many of us were really cornered we might have a hard time saying exactly what it is we love so much about this 'high brow' art.
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Post by Vissi » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

Stop us before we spread to another planet!!!Haute New Art
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Post by chris baschon » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

Thank you Ivor Orr!!!!!

Even when attempting to not be a "flighty artist" I am one. I am just now seeing that my comment was put on the thread, and your comments about my website. Thank you very much. Also I have gone round and round in finding my profile (It has taken me months. Of course not continuously.) Thanks for including the "click here" to go to my website too. I'll check on what the problem might be thru JCF. Could it be I did not include the http://www.thecirclewithin.com?

Again thank you.

I so enjoy the JCF website at so many levels!

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Post by Poncho » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

Hello Chaps and Chapesses,

It's that time of year again. The result of this year's Turner Prize has just been announced. Click HERE if you are interested. <IMG SRC="/forum/images/smiles/icon_lol.gif">

But is it art?! All part of the fun of being English <IMG SRC="/forum/images/smiles/icon_lol.gif">
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Post by Vissi » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

ivor,

I believe the following quote from the article speaks for me:
The Tate's selection panel, having scoured the country over the past dozen years to find transvestite potters, dirty beds and sliced cows, was possibly too exhausted to whip up headlines again.
The question in these times may not be so much, "Is it Art?" as it "Is it fit for exploitainment?"

Always fun to see what you trend-setting Brits are up to so we Yanks will know what is soon to be en vogue here! <IMG SRC="/forum/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif">

Cheers,
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Post by Martin_Weyers » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

I liked the artist's statement:

"Of course I like the work to be amusing on one level but it is a serious business on another and the nutty professor thing seems a bit whimsical."

Who says the English don't have a sense of humour?

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Post by Poncho » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

Modern British Art strikes again <IMG SRC="/forum/images/smiles/icon_lol.gif">


From Monday's Daily Mail:
Beware of the Bang as sculpture rains spikes



By Jaya Narain



Rising high above the skyline, it is the tallest and perhaps the most dramatic sculpture in Britain.

Costing almost £1.5million to create, Manchester’s 184ft installation known as The B of the Bang was designed to resemble an exploding firework and was unveiled with great fanfare in January this year.

But anyone who wishes to view it at close quarters this festive season will be disappointed.

Some 7ft steel spikes have plunged 80ft to the ground and contractors might have to remove parts of the sculpture to test for safety.

So dangerous has the work of art become that an exclusion zone has been placed around it to prevent members of the public being impaled.

A slip road also had be closed next to the sculpture outside the City of Manchester stadium over fears that one of the spikes could spear a vehicle. Critics say the sculpture, which was funded by the North West Development Agency and the European Regional Development Fund, is a huge waste of taxpayers’ money and have called for it to be taken down and funds to be raked back from designer Thomas Heatherwick.

Mr Heatherwick, 35, a former student at Manchester Polytechnic, created the sculpture after winning a competition run by the urban regeneration agency New East Manchester.

The installation was opened by Olympic gold medallist Linford Christie and was inspired by a quotation from the sprinter in which he said he tried to begin his races on the ‘B of the Bang’, meaning he launched into his run at the very moment when the starter’s pistol went off.

Made up of 180 slender tapered spikes and standing 20 storeys high, it is only three feet shorter than Nelson’s Column.

Stuart Hall, the veteran TV and radio presenter who regularly commentates at the stadium, said: ‘I hate it. It cost £1.5million and spikes are falling off it already. It will eventually kill someone.

‘The money could be more wisely spent. I really don’t see the point of it. It doesn’t do anything. If you come to Manchester and look at the CENTRAL LIBRARY and that beautiful Romanesque gothic TOWN HALL – that’s the soul of Manchester.

‘Yet they go and build this ghastly sculpture that nobody likes. It will just rust away like everything else in modern Britain.’

Norman Rylance, 55, who lives 100 yards away from the installation and can see it from his front door, described it as nothing but an eyesore. He added: ‘Most people I’ve spoken to think it’s a monstrosity.’

Neighbour Sara Fredericks, 35, said: ‘It is a ludicrous waste of public money and the designer and the people who constructed it should be dragged over the coals for this.’

Engineers say the fault with the work lies in its design and claim the spikes exert too much pressure on the structure. Independent engineer Josh Lennon said: ‘There is too much stress on the core column and I don’t believe it will ever be a viable sculpture.’

An investigation has been launched to find out why the sculpture, which was designed to withstand winds of more than 100mph, has begun to fall apart.

A spokesman for New East Manchester said: ‘Contractors are carrying out tests both on and off site.’

Thomas Heatherwick and his studio refused to comment.



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Post by vhhancock » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

What if the overt design (able to withstand 100 mph winds) was actually a metaphor, and the falling spikes were a part of the covert design--meant to express (impress?) the metaphor's value?

Maybe modern art can have an impact.

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Post by Martin_Weyers » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

Independant from the metaphorical references, I find the b of bang somehow impressive. Though I have to admit, that the design is not the invention of the artist, it's rather a transformation of well-known computer graphics into a three-dimensional draft. However, in my judgement a nice piece for a public place (as long as it does not kill anybody). And obviously a technical challenge for the producers. Maybe also an aesthetic challenge for the residents. Welcome in the 21th century, Manchester!

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