What do You Lose When You Lose Your Myth

Do you have a conversation topic that doesn't seem to fit any of the other conversations? Here is where we discuss ANYTHING about Joseph Campbell, comparative mythology, and more!

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A J
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Post by A J » Thu Jan 17, 2008 3:59 pm

Vissi wrote:When one is free to constantly redefine the melody of the myth through creative questioning, the bird rises, like the phoenix, from the ashes of the old, hardened paradoxes that bound it to other times and places. Campbell remarks often on the need to bring the myth forward, to allow it to breathe in our own times so we can relate, through our actual experience of it, rather than attempting to shape ourselves to suit something that cannot sing in our age. Many who are familiar with Campbell's work find that rather than separating them from their faith, his conceptualizing of the universal tenets inherent in all wisdom traditions, has the effect of strengthening their spirituality.
It is so good to hear from you again, Dixie. Your wisdom, coupled with your adept means of self-expression, have been missed lately. I think you have answered sladeb's original question, at least as I perceived it, in a nutshell.

If God is indeed a God of love, infinite love, capable of forgiveness of all our personal foibles, sins, and transgressions, why is God not capable of making an infinite and eternal rapprochement with His/Her own shadowed, temporal emanation in the form of the character of Lucifer/Satan/Iblis/Shaitan?
I wish I had a better grip on this one. My current response is to say that our perceptions of God are reflections of ourselves: Man makes God in his own image rather than the other way around. I, too, hope I'm not being overly heretical with that statement. As long as we have a Shadow personality, God will have one as well??
Secondly, is the martyrdom of Jesus truly the central point of Christianity that one should focus upon? Is martyrdom a noble sacrifice and why does the God who forbids Abraham's sacrifice of Isaac, require Jesus's death?

Peace, love. joy,
Dixie
IMVHO, the answer to the first question re martyrdom, is "No." The part of Christianity that one should focus on is His message, and the way He personally lived it. I don't think God required Jesus' death; I think we did. Something in the human personality requires a scapegoat, and the means to control God. Isaac was willing to sacrifice his own son to satisfy that need, until God stopped him, and told him to substitute animals instead (or so the story goes). Focusing on Christ as the ultimate sacrifice hasn't changed human nature. It just gives us another out. (A heretical statement once again.) I've heard several "postmodern" Christians say that it just isn't the point. I'm currently reading a book by John D. Caputo, What Would Jesus Deconstruct. I'll let you know when I finish it, if it has an answer.

AJ
"Sacred space and sacred time and something joyous to do is all we need. Almost anything then becomes a continuous and increasing joy."

A Joseph Campbell Companion: Reflections on the Art of Living
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Post by A J » Thu Jan 17, 2008 4:19 pm

Clemsy wrote:
When the liberals leave, the organization goes even further off track.
AJ, there is such a temptation to run with this thought in a direction that may be erroneous. So I'll do so cautiously. Mixing politics and religion is really destructive to both. The Catholic Church decided to play a separate but parallel game a while ago (after we took the thumbscrews, bundles of sticks and torches out of their hands), resulting in rather left wing activities. You know, priests and nuns demonstrating against war... that sort of thing. Currently there is a tendency to jump back in the pool (If you are a pro-abortion politician, you can't receive communion and the like), along with the activist evangelicals, militant dominionists, kooks and crazies.

Looking at the middle school where I work as a kind of microcosm of the greater society I see mostly Christian colleagues who go to church every Sunday. I do believe they are a majority. However, of all these people only one or two can be considered fundamentalist. The others break down evenly between liberal, conservative and clueless (which may be a definition of 'centrist' today?) and share the same churches on Sundays.

The main difference between conservative and liberal Christians is a tendency for the conservative to have an urge to mandate what they consider the best for all, while the left leaning tend to want to mind their own business.

The conservative looks outward in the old ethnic model, the liberal tends to be more inward? Enough of this looking outward in superiority and disdain, masked by slogans like 'hate the sin, love the sinner,' and the inward types are liable to throw up their hands and take it elsewhere.

If what I am seeing is generally true, then I imagine many congregations are experiencing what you relate: the conservative, old time religioners who look back on the 50's as the golden age, and those who consider their relationship with the divine a personal matter. I wonder.... are those in this backlash Huckabee fans?

Cheers,
Clemsy

Vissi! Nice to see you!
Clemsy, you seem to have a pretty good picture. I would add that within the Espiscopal denomination, at least here in the south, the immediate concern has been the election of a gay bishop, the practice of conferring same-sex marriage, and the election of a woman as head of the church in the US. For those who insist on holding on to what Vissi referred to as "dogmatizing and concretizing," this step forward has been too much of a leap. It's brought them out of the woodwork, I'm afraid.

AJ
"Sacred space and sacred time and something joyous to do is all we need. Almost anything then becomes a continuous and increasing joy."

A Joseph Campbell Companion: Reflections on the Art of Living
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Post by Clemsy » Thu Jan 17, 2008 5:16 pm

I was discussing this thread with Mrs. Clemsy and that is precisely the situation she thought of, the clever lass.

You know, it's interesting: Humans have a clear tendency toward diversification, Christianity being a classic example. however, humans also have a clear tendency toward keeping, often resorting to violence if not genocide, diversification from happening.

Christianity, again, being a classic example.

I know the changes you mentioned are causing a lot of heartache within your church. For many, it seems a schism is invevitable, no? There's that diversification thing again. One hopes the reaction falls in line with Christian humility instead of anger and hatred.
Give me stories before I go mad! ~Andreas
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Post by wags » Fri Jan 18, 2008 10:59 am

hello,

just could not help myself,


this satan and the like, are all man made entities.
a definition to describe a person that has not found the Jesus in themselves. scare tactics of the powers that be, at the time.

as the sun rises...
may peace preceed your every step, wags
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Post by bodhibliss » Thu Jan 31, 2008 8:20 pm

Nandu notes:
It's been my experience that you can bury your religion but not your myth. Never. You are it, and it is you.

The myth is ingrained somewhere deep down, much deeper than conscious thought and even subconscious images. It is where the conscious and subconscious originate.

Christ was never in Churches, but within you; if you look deep, you'll find him living there still.


And Evinnra touches on the same vein:
To be rather blunt: if myth is lost its not the myth that is gone but our ability to relate to it.


This leads me to speculate that if we can "lose our myth," then maybe the myth we lose was never our myth to begin with?

I don't have much trouble relating to Christmas. I love the music, I love tidings of joy, of peace on Earth and good will to men (and most women), and I love to raise a huge tree and decorate it with hundreds of colored lights and hundreds of ornaments hanging from boughs everywhere, creating surreal backlit spontaneous tableaus deep within the bowels of the tree; I am even moved by the exquisitely choreographed midnight mass in Saint Peter's, with the singing and the recitations and the ornate garments and the bells and the censers streaming incense - even though I can't smell the incense, and mostly have no idea what the Pope is intoning in Latin, it still feels sacred and holy and magnificent, magnified all the more by the realization that millions around the world are focused on this ritual performance.

And I am moved by the movies, those Hollywood productions that define the American Christmas myth: Ralphie finds his Red Ryder rifle under the Tree; Jimmy Stewart's selflessness is rewarded and he is redeemed when he realizes it is indeed a wonderful life; the pagan pageantry that greets those who ride the Polar Express reinforces (and mourns the loss of) the magical power of childhood imagination

... oddly enough, these are all secular movies. Not much if any mention of the Virgin Birth here - and even The Bishop's Wife (one of my favorites, with David Niven, Loretta Young and Cary Grant), with the tension between clergyman and angel, lingers not on the scriptural account, but conveys powerful life lessons that transcend denominational dogma.

I love the sense of joy and birth of possibilities that fuels the holiday spirit - and I have no problem with a myth that celebrates the birth of the divine concentrated in a babe in a lowly manger. It's a myth that's been around for a while, no matter what form its expression takes.

But then, I haven't lost my myth - I've found it - so I'm free to celebrate it in any of its multiple manifestations.

But there was a time, as I struggled past the constraints of the fundamentalist cult in which I was raised, that it felt like I was losing something important - like I was losing my myth. The years after leaving the confines of the Church were years of inner turmoil and outer catastrophe for me, as I felt lost and had no firm ground on which to stand.

What happens when we lose our myth? Campbell offers thoughts on what happens on the collective scale:
We have seen what has happened to primitive communities unsettled by the white man's civilization. With their old taboos discredited, they immediately go to pieces, disintegrate, and become resorts of vice and dis-ease.
What happens to a culture seems to be echoed in the individual when one loses one's myth: I went to pieces - but it's a darn good thing I did. It allowed me, in Sladeb's words, to "to claim back my heritage in a way that provides a satisfactory framework for my own life, a set of lenses through which to participate joyfully in all the incongruities of life."

AJ's posts, discussing her renewed participation in the rituals of the Church, seem an example of exactly that - and I am again reminded of something Joe said:
It doesn't matter to me whether my guiding angel is for a time named Vishnu, Shiva, Jesus, or the Buddha. If you're not distracted by names or the color of hair, the same message is there, variously turned. In the multitude of myths and legends that have been preserved to us - both in our Western arts and literature, synagogues and churches, and in the rites and teachings of those Oriental and primitive heritages now becoming known to us - we may still find guidance.

Joseph Campbell, "The Need for New Myth" (an interview with Gerald Clarke)
Maybe we need to lose our myth, in order to find our myth.

Namaste,
bodhibliss
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Post by Evinnra » Fri Feb 01, 2008 1:36 am

bodhibliss wrote:

And Evinnra touches on the same vein:
To be rather blunt: if myth is lost its not the myth that is gone but our ability to relate to it.


This leads me to speculate that if we can "lose our myth," then maybe the myth we lose was never our myth to begin with?


But there was a time, as I struggled past the constraints of the fundamentalist cult in which I was raised, that it felt like I was losing something important - like I was losing my myth. The years after leaving the confines of the Church were years of inner turmoil and outer catastrophe for me, as I felt lost and had no firm ground on which to stand.

What happens when we lose our myth? Campbell offers thoughts on what happens on the collective scale:
We have seen what has happened to primitive communities unsettled by the white man's civilization. With their old taboos discredited, they immediately go to pieces, disintegrate, and become resorts of vice and dis-ease.
What happens to a culture seems to be echoed in the individual when one loses one's myth: I went to pieces - but it's a darn good thing I did. It allowed me, in Sladeb's words, to "to claim back my heritage in a way that provides a satisfactory framework for my own life, a set of lenses through which to participate joyfully in all the incongruities of life."


Maybe we need to lose our myth, in order to find our myth.

Namaste,
bodhibliss
Dear Bodhi, so happy to see you back on board! :P

You write:
'This leads me to speculate that if we can "lose our myth," then maybe the myth we lose was never our myth to begin with?' and your final sentence is: 'Maybe we need to lose our myth, in order to find our myth.'

Do you mean that when we lose the myth we simply lose its relevance to us for a while? That would not be such a sad thing after all, since all of us came here to evolve, to experience, to participate and if we had remained rigid in our evaluation as to what is relevant we could not remain active. Its like a love affair, one must pay attention for a while then move away (internally) so one could freely choose to return or not. Though, with Myth and Religion, that 'turning away' is never quite complete since these ideologies are - I believe - part and parcel of our very self. Perhaps love affairs are the same too, since our relationships with our parents, children, spouse or beloved tend to leave a permanent mark on our rational/intuitional process.

I'm rambling again, :roll: so sorry ... :?

On the 'Superhuman' thread I went on and on about the importance of our freedom being in our ability to take responsibility for our choices. On this thread I'm again pointing to the individual's own ability to find relevant the independent existence of Myth and Religion. (It will not take long before an associate with a degree in Psychology will point out that perhaps I have issues with taking responsibility for my own choices. :oops: ) But, do you think I am on the right track with this focus on the individual's freedom?

As Professor Campbell wrote:
We have seen what has happened to primitive communities unsettled by the white man's civilization. With their old taboos discredited, they immediately go to pieces, disintegrate, and become resorts of vice and dis-ease.
If our global community prefers to survive - instead of falling pray to scare-mongering - we would have to start with our selves and one by one restore our own connection to Myth and Religion.
'A fish popped out of the water only to be recaptured again. It is as I, a slave to all yet free of everything.'
http://evinnra-evinnra.blogspot.com
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Post by bodhibliss » Fri Feb 01, 2008 3:52 am

Evinnra wrote: You write:

'This leads me to speculate that if we can "lose our myth," then maybe the myth we lose was never our myth to begin with?' and your final sentence is: 'Maybe we need to lose our myth, in order to find our myth.'

Do you mean that when we lose the myth we simply lose its relevance to us for a while?
Not exactly, though I believe your formulation rings true as well.

Essentially, though, what I'm saying is closer to Campbell's favorite saying of Meister Eckhart - that "we must be willing to leave God for God."

The myth I grew up with was not my myth, but a myth imposed on me by force. It did not ring true, but it was all I knew. Hence, when I left that faith it did feel like I was abandoning "my" myth - or rather, that the religion now felt like "myth" (in the current popular usage of "something not true").

However, that leaving of the Church, which for me meant abandoning a concrete reality (we didn't think of it as a "myth," but something literally and factually true, and it shaped every aspect of our lives and punished every natural impulse), set me free to find my own myth.

So now I'm not a Christian - but I participate in Christmas, experience the sacred, festive feel of the period, am imbued with hope and life, reborn

... and I experience the same thing at a Wiccan solstice celebration, or a sweat lodge ceremony, a high mass, or sharing prasad in a Hindu temple.

As Campbell says, " It doesn't matter to me whether my guiding angel is for a time named Vishnu, Shiva, Jesus, or the Buddha ..."

There was a time when it did matter for me - and that became a stumbling block - so I had to "lose" my myth to find my myth (step past the concretization to embrace the transcendent).

But that's my myth - doesn't need to be anyone else's. I enjoying playing with, honoring, worshipping, celebrating, and putting on and off the many Masks of God

... but others might be more comfortable with a favorite Mask - it's through that particular Mask that they engage the transcendent. Works just as well as my approach.

I haven't visited the Superhuman thread recently, so any observation I make would be inadequate - but I think you are indeed on to something. Campbell points out the individual has gradually become more sharply defined in Western culture over the last thousand years. In the Campbell Companion (Osbon) he notes that rather than fix the world, we are to fix ourselves

... and seems to me it radiates out from there.

What impact I have on friends and family members is not because they sign up for the Cult of Bodhibliss (I tried, but most draw the line at the commandment to tithe 90% of their income to me), but because spiritual transformation proves contagious.

It's gratifying, though, to see changes in their lives ripple out and affect others.

It takes time, and commitment, but the dynamic is much the same as that song, "Let there be Peace on Earth, and Let it Begin with Me ..."

These days I will definitely lose my way from time to time, but I don't believe it's possible to lose one's myth, once one has found one's myth.

At least, that's my story (Greek = myth), and I'm sticking to it!

:P

bodhibliss
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Post by pulsarzen » Sun Feb 03, 2008 6:36 pm

They thought it would be a disgrace to go forth as a group. Each entered the forest at a point that he himself had chosen, where it was darkest and there were no path and you are not on the adventure.

The above does so much for the spirit of living not just a holiday but into each day.
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Post by davidh » Mon Feb 04, 2008 3:19 pm

pulsarzen

you used one of my favorite quotes and another: the kingdom of heaven is here on earth and man does not see it- gospel of thomas!

After twenty years of reading Joseph Campbell, this is one of his greatest gifts to me. The fidelity of wisdom garnered in this manner has been a blessing words cannot express.

The other: find someone you like and read everything they wrote; then read everything they read!

If you desire a wonderful journey, try that advice with Joseph Campbell.
In 20 years, I have read most all of Campbell and a bunch of what he has read and it is an awakening with each new text.

When I do return to the Episcopal church for a wedding or funeral, my eyes do water and my soul expands with the beautiful liturgy. I have that same feeling when I hear Pavaratti sing a Puccini. They are both beautiful and come from the same place in my view. But then Campbell had me read Jung.

The adventure for me is going forward, in the dark, which sometimes entails going backwards. I will leave you with something sublime written by a proclaimed Christian.

We shall not cease from exploration
and the end of all our exploring
will be to arrive where we started
and know the place for the first time.
T.S.Elliot
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What Do You Do When You Lose Your Myth?

Post by JadeBuddha » Mon Feb 04, 2008 4:43 pm

I was raised in a Fundamentalist Christian family, with a very black and white, very literal interpretation of the Bible. I asked many questions about the Bible that didn’t, in my opinion, receive very acceptable answers, though taking the hint, would often drop the subject, and try simply to improve my inadequate faith in the answers as they were given. Eventually, as I got older, I stopped attending church with my family. I wrestled with the notion that either; A. I was likely going to Hell, or B. I’m basically a good person, and that’s probably good enough for God. He wouldn’t send me to Hell, just because I don’t go to church, despite the fact that the church said that part of being saved was the regular attendance of church services.

In 1997, at the age of 26, I joined the Freemasons, thinking that I could become a better man, as they suggested in their literature. I was struck by the 3 tenets of Freemasonry, namely Brotherly love, Relief and Truth. Mostly I was intrigued by Truth. I also reasoned that I could become a better man without having to attend church, thus improving my chances of going to Heaven in the end. I attended the lodge regularly until 2002, when I moved out of the area. Leaving the lodge was alright with me, as I was already becoming disillusioned with it all. There was not enough interest among the brothers in the discussion of or exploration of Truth.

In 2002, I read The DaVinci Code, and was struck by the notion that the Council of Nicaea voted on the divinity of Jesus. This was completely shocking to me. I’d never given a moment’s thought that his divinity was ever in question, let alone the idea that the entire course of Christianity could hang upon decisions made by men. Whether the bit about the Council of Nicaea was true or not didn’t matter. What else had I always assumed? What else didn’t I know about? Despite my lack of adherence to a strict Christian dogma, I still regarded Heaven and Hell as real places. These ideas were the very things that determined my actions, daily, and they were all based upon assumptions I’d never questioned. I clearly had to learn more.

A few months later, I picked up a copy of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. I didn’t know what it was about, but the smartest friend I had had read it when we were in high school. Maybe I was thinking I should start playing catch-up in my literary pursuits. The book was full of philosophy! I didn’t know anything about philosophy, or what it really even was. It wasn’t a popular or encouraged course in high school. I was in love with it immediately! I had never even thought people could think like this! The Western philosophy put me off a bit. It was rather heady, and full of terms and concepts I didn’t get. But the Eastern philosophy had a kind of simplicity that rang clear with me, and filled me with new thoughts (some of my first thoughts, I think). I had to learn more.

Spending the next year reading about Zen, and Buddhism in general, I discovered that there was a small Zen center not too far away. In 2003, I began attending their Tuesday evening meditation sessions. It was wonderful! We would sit in meditation for 20 to 30 minutes, there would be a lecture on some aspect of Zen, followed by tea in the anteroom.

In 2004, I took the vows of a lay person, making it official. I was a Buddhist. I had finally found a religion, and it was going to set me free! I expressed interest in someday becoming a novice monk, and the abbot taught me how to prepare the hall and light the candles and incense for him. It was all very church-like. In hindsight, maybe that was the first hint of the problem. It was all very church-like.

I was starting to see some similarities between the two religions that had me questioning, well, religion. I still hadn’t quite reconciled with the fact that I had abandoned Christianity. There was still an inkling that I could go to Hell for that. Buddha had taught me that I could have happiness in this world, but my Christian upbringing kept nagging me that I could still be in trouble in the next world. The more I thought about the two religions side-by-side, the more I started to see a bigger picture. I began to see things from a more anthropological point of view. Each culture seemed to invent a religion for itself to deal with the questions it couldn’t answer. I could see that this was a very important direction. It seemed to me that Christianity dealt with; How did we get here, why are we here, and what happens when we die? Buddhism seemed more interested in the latter two questions. Buddha considered the first question of no real importance, since it could only be endlessly debated. I’d come to these conclusions, and realizing that if I stayed with Buddhism , I wouldn’t likely move forward, but sideways, I stopped attending the Zendo This was in April of 2005.

This wasn’t the end of my spiritual pursuits however. Later that year, I had learned about Joseph Campbell from Wikipedia. I was curious about autodidacts, and his name appeared on a list of famous ones. He was described as a noted mythologist, which reminded me of the main character of The DaVinci Code, so I read about him, only to hear some of my own thoughts and conclusions about religion supported by his vastly deeper knowledge!

Suddenly, my spiritual development had a new and fascinating direction to grow, and I began listening to his lectures, reading his books, and reading the authors he’d read. I learned about the monomyth and Jung’s archetypes, and became quite good at recognizing them in literature, movies, and television. The 1960’s television show, The Prisoner was my favorite.

I was finally free! I began looking at other religions and philosophies as poetry instead of prose. It was all metaphor, and it was there to help you get through life! I read the Upanishads and about Sufism. I even read the Principia Discordia, and found it most liberating, clearly written by a trickster. I could finally peek at the things that would have sent me to Hell back when I had been living under the yoke of a myth. I read about alchemy and the occult and I realized they were also simply poetic metaphor. Incidentally, alchemy is absolutely beautiful poetry.

Last year, 2007, I realized that I’d lost my myth. I wasn’t a Christian or quite a Buddhist. What was I? Who was I? Who was Number One? I was beginning to get edgy and depressed. I lost my myth. I was adrift. All around me I saw family and others who still had their myths. I’d given mine up. The myth is the music of life, and I’d given it up. It made me feel small and outside the world.

Then, yesterday I received an email for the Joseph Campbell Foundation. The topic was “What Do You Do When You Lose Your Myth?” What did Campbell say about invisible hands guiding him? I went to the website and began reading through the comments of others who seemed to be in the same boat. THANK YOU! One of the postings on the site had the quote, “We in the Episcopal Church understand Jesus as our connection to The Divine, but to say that he is the only way would be to put God in a very small box.” I began to think about that. I’d read similar things before, but at this time in my life, it got me imagining something very different.

I picture a vast expanse, dotted with big cardboard boxes. Each box is a religion. I simply climbed out of mine. Now I’m outside the box of God, with vast nothingness all around me. But am I? Maybe the boxes are just there to put a boundary on God for those that need one. I think God is out here, too. I stand here looking out at all the other boxes. I climb into the one labeled Buddhism. It’s very similar inside. I like it better outside. And it’s not as bad as I thought out here. I can climb in and out of boxes at will whenever I want. And this isn’t emptiness out here. There are others out here with me. I thought it was empty, but it’s really just big.
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Post by davidh » Mon Feb 04, 2008 5:13 pm

Jade Buddha,

Sounds like you have done the work - welcome to darkness.

Read the TS Elliot poem again; you are already there and perhaps don't recognize it.

Congratulations!
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Post by JadeBuddha » Wed Feb 06, 2008 12:40 am

Thank you davidh. There's brilliance in TS Elliot. I'm also fond of the Gospel of Thomas' line, "Split wood, I am there. Lift up a rock, you will find me there." I often forget to see heaven all around me. Learning to see it is the real trick, isn't it? It's all very Wizard of Oz'y.
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Post by Clemsy » Wed Feb 06, 2008 1:12 am

JadeBuddha,

Welcome to the JCF Forums! Thanks for sharing your story! Great first post.

Cheers,
Clemsy
Give me stories before I go mad! ~Andreas
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Post by davidh » Wed Feb 06, 2008 3:36 am

Group,

As I read the above comments, the following quotes kept popping up:


Man's last and highest leave-taking is leaving God for God.
Meister Eckhart


Thou shalt know by experience how salt the savor is of other's bread, and how sad a path it is to climb and descend another’s stairs.

[It., Tu proverai si come sa di sale
Lo pane altrui, e com e duro calle
Lo scendere e'l salir per l'altrui scale.]
Paradiso (XVII, 58)



Two roads diverged in the woods, and I, I took the one less traveled by and that has made all the difference. -Robert Frost


I can remember Campbell, in a video lecture, repeating: shattering, shattering, shattering….
It is the myth of the moon, waxing and waning, light to dark, dark to light, being saved at a tent revival, death and resurrection.

I thought of Campbell’s, The Inner Reaches of Outer Space.
I thought of idolatry.

I thought of the Campbell story of his conversation with a priest beside a pool at a health club in New York. Perhaps you remember - he asked the priest if he believed in a personal God, the priest said yes and Campbell made a witty remark that turned the priest away in silence. The point being, Campbell did not believe in a personal God. He believed very much in the sublime.

Another great Campbell quote when a reporter asked him what religion he subscribed to, his retort: I believe in underlining books!

Campbell has led me to a lot of good books that have led me to a lot of exposure to wisdom.

AJ – I was baptized as an infant in the Episcopal Church and remained in it for 40 years served on the vestry. It was and is a beautiful body in the whole. Unfortunately, I was in the diocese of Ft Worth – no more need be said. I experienced great darkness upon leaving 20 yrs ago – shattering, shattering, shattering – but out of that darkness came a wonderful light.


Their is much beauty to be found within the Church and without.
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Losing Myth

Post by CellophaneFlowers » Thu Feb 07, 2008 6:56 pm

I'm young, but I have, in my short life, gone through the loss of religion. I was raised very fundamentally Christian. When I left for college, I also left the church and began to disbelieve the teachings. For me, I think that this wasn't so much a loss of Mythology, as it was opening the door to really discover it.

I was never a very spiritual person. I could never quite resign myself to just take what the pastors and the elders said as truth. However, when I denounced my religion and began studying Mythology, I began to feel stirrings of a spiritual nature for the first time in my life. The cohesiveness of the human race and the inherent values and traditions that span every culture that is and was inspire me. The fact that mythology is the same across country boundaries makes me believe in a universal unconscious more than anything in Christianity made me believe that there was a God.

Therefore I'm glad I left the Mythology I was reared in, because that gave me the opportunity to truly find Mythology and bask in every beautiful story the World has to offer.
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