Character Power

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Knightwriter
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Character Power

Post by Knightwriter » Sun Jul 13, 2014 2:50 am

As a writer I am deeply interested in the power of fiction my early series relied on very large casts of one and two dimensional characters to propel them with no clear protagonists though I have since graduated to everything from coming of age stories to historical action thrillers and action driven romantic comedies. What I'm really curious to know is can characters truly have power that is do some have an inherent strength to them entirely independent of popularity or how well developed they are and if so what does this mean? I'm mostly interested in this as matter of narrative longevity but I still am very curious about characters that challenge the mighty Zeus (the storytellers) and if so can any win in a battle)
Last edited by Knightwriter on Mon Jul 14, 2014 1:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
FDamkar
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Post by FDamkar » Sun Jul 13, 2014 7:53 pm

Well, I don't know about Zeus and the concert thing, but I can definitely agree that fictional characters can indeed have a strength to them that can propel the story forward that's independent of popularity or transformation. If their personalities or goals or whatever are what attract the reader/viewer to them and draws us into their struggles, then yes, the characters can definitely have power.

It's in human nature for us to gravitate towards a character we like or at least feel something towards because of their strong impressions on us or because they have qualities that we see in ourselves or qualities we want to have. I guarantee you that everyone has a least a favorite, or at least has a connection, to a character from some form of fiction because of what/how these characters say, do, act, think, etc. And if we see ourselves int these characters or if we see qualities that we want to have from them, then that's the power of their character right there. *laughs*
Andreas
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Post by Andreas » Mon Jul 14, 2014 8:15 am

Hey guys,

Thought I share my 2 cents, and since I dont want to reinvent the wheel, I'll offer a link that sums up the issue, for me.

http://www.simonmorden.com/about/essays ... ood-story/
I do not care about these people’ are the seven deadly words no author wants to hear.
So true. ^^

Njoy.
“To live is enough.” ― Shunryu Suzuki
Knightwriter
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Post by Knightwriter » Mon Jul 14, 2014 4:02 pm

I have to agree with a lot of what that article said many of writers overlook that the setting is a character with the my series mentioned above I actually cut back some of the focus on characterization because I wanted the setting a school campus to be the true protagonist as funny as it sounds. Themes certainly shouldn't detract from the entertainment of a book and a writer certainly shouldn't preach the point is to elevate the narrative to something greater than entertainment, stimulate the mind, increase longevity in the culture and of course get critics some people get confused between the frosting and the cake. Characters have to change it doesn't mean that everyone has to be well very well rounded but a world where only the hero changes or maybe doesn't at all makes a world far less compelling than one where not even minor characters are static.
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