Books/Films based on Campbell's Work

Who was Joseph Campbell? What is a myth? What does "Follow Your Bliss" mean? If you are new to the work of Joseph Campbell, this forum is a good place to start.

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Books/Films based on Campbell's Work

Post by NadieAchak » Sun Oct 12, 2014 3:36 pm

I've written my memoir about my journey (hero), and it's been a difficult write because of my horrid childhood. I am in the midst of revising/rewriting it and have been advised of the following:

"I sense that there are two Nadie's. The un-reconstituted one and the more beautiful, self-designed one. The latter being whom you've turned yourself into, in order to fashion a meaningful life.

"While you write, it has to come from the primitive self as much, no, more than from the advanced self. Simply because the advanced self is never interesting. It lacks humanity. By that I mean, the shadowy wetness, messiness and rawness that draws the reader in. In your picture I see a kind and compassionate woman. Someone I would feel drawn to, feel safe with. But when you write, you must set her aside and let the beast come out, the bete noir. Let her come out and, over the course of your memoir, write her from her dark beginnings through to her later transformation."

"You cannot write compellingly about the dark from your perch in the light. I recommend strongly that you use a grounding practice so this process doesn't discombobulate you too much. That said, if you're not seriously stirred up by your writing, you have not yet tapped the emotions before the date when they became transformed in your personal development process."

I'm almost 70. My daughter/granddaughters are insisting I finish the book before I die. I had a close call recently, but survived. My goal is to finish this book and leave it as a legacy for my girls. It will not be published, although many believe it has great potential.

What I'd love to know if any members know of writers/filmmakers that have applied Joseph Campbell's work -- other than Star Wars. This is a memoir, so preferably writers/filmmakers in this genre. Thanks, Nadie
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Re: Books/Films based on Campbell's Work

Post by JamesN. » Sun Oct 12, 2014 6:53 pm

NadieAchak wrote:I've written my memoir about my journey (hero), and it's been a difficult write because of my horrid childhood. I am in the midst of revising/rewriting it and have been advised of the following:

"I sense that there are two Nadie's. The un-reconstituted one and the more beautiful, self-designed one. The latter being whom you've turned yourself into, in order to fashion a meaningful life.

"While you write, it has to come from the primitive self as much, no, more than from the advanced self. Simply because the advanced self is never interesting. It lacks humanity. By that I mean, the shadowy wetness, messiness and rawness that draws the reader in. In your picture I see a kind and compassionate woman. Someone I would feel drawn to, feel safe with. But when you write, you must set her aside and let the beast come out, the bete noir. Let her come out and, over the course of your memoir, write her from her dark beginnings through to her later transformation."

"You cannot write compellingly about the dark from your perch in the light. I recommend strongly that you use a grounding practice so this process doesn't discombobulate you too much. That said, if you're not seriously stirred up by your writing, you have not yet tapped the emotions before the date when they became transformed in your personal development process."

I'm almost 70. My daughter/granddaughters are insisting I finish the book before I die. I had a close call recently, but survived. My goal is to finish this book and leave it as a legacy for my girls. It will not be published, although many believe it has great potential.

What I'd love to know if any members know of writers/filmmakers that have applied Joseph Campbell's work -- other than Star Wars. This is a memoir, so preferably writers/filmmakers in this genre. Thanks, Nadie


Hello NadieAchak; how nice to have you back.

It's been awhile and I hope things are going well for you. How very cool you are working on your memoir and I will offer a couple of recommendations concerning the boards here. Clemsy and Cindy might have some suggestions for you; and CarmelaBear who finished her book sometime back might have some helpful thoughts; http://www.jcf.org/new/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3308

In the meantime here is a thread that just got started on Chris Vogler who is well known in Hollywood for his application for script writing; ( you might start there ); http://www.jcf.org/new/forum/viewtopic.php?t=5150
; although this may or may not address the kind of area you are looking for. ( I'm a little unsure exactly if you meant work concerning Joseph Campbell; such as books and DVD's; which are biographical like " Fire in the Mind or The Hero's Journey "; or an approach to his themes such as the thread I mentioned. ) There are a few older writing threads scattered across the forums that have not been activated in awhile such as " The writing life ": http://www.jcf.org/new/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2085 ; so you might try looking around the forum index and see if anything matches up with your interests. In the meantime I hope this is helpful and I will shoot a message to Clemsy.

Welcome back.

Cheers :)
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Post by Clemsy » Sun Oct 12, 2014 10:59 pm

Nadie,

I hope I can find you a reference. I'm sure someone in the JCF would be aware of what might be out there. I will forward your query and get back to you as soon as may be.

I wish you all the best in this pursuit. As an English teacher I often encourage my students to write the stories they would want their children to know. It sounds like yours are anxious for your story, so I truly hope we can be of assistance.

Cheers,
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Post by Clemsy » Sun Oct 12, 2014 11:26 pm

And, Nadie, I would like to add that when composing your own memoir, your own hero's journey, the bottom line is to tell your story. I don't know about "unreconstituted" and "self-designed" selves. We are who we are in the moment we exist, and in the end if one is tell the story of one's life, then one must be a storyteller.

The hero's journey is an archetype, so it will find its way out of you as a storyteller.

Cheers, again!
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Post by NadieAchak » Mon Oct 13, 2014 2:58 pm

Thank you James for a warm welcome back. I've been busy writing my memoir. I joined Scribeophile for critiques before sending my book to an editor. I'm back because this is where it all began for me, Joseph Campbell. Thanks for the links - very helpful, so I'll spend the day reading them. I purchased Chris Vogler's book on Kindle: MEMO FROM THE STORY DEPARTMENT: Secrets of Structure and Character. $16.79 on Kindle is a bit much, but I'm desperate :D

It weren't for this marvelous man, Joseph Campbell, I would not have understood my life - all the twist and turns. The critters are requesting more details about my childhood, which I hadn't plan to share with my girls. I mostly hinted at the bad times. Everyone's encouraging me to publish, but I'm hesitant. However, I do plan to have it bound professionally. I will continue to meditate on publishing. I think it's going to be a yes, since my girls, brothers, and 90 year old aunt are not concerned about exposing my parents' abuse, which has turned into a book in itself.

I love Joseph's two books: Fire in the Mind and The Hero's Journey. I have ALL of his books and the videos with Bill Moyer, which are priceless.

Thank you for timely response and, more importantly, the links, which held a nugget: Chris Volger's book. Have a lovely week and God speed :)
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Post by NadieAchak » Mon Oct 13, 2014 3:05 pm

Hello Clemsy. thank you for the reminder; it is very reassuring, "The hero's journey is an archetype, so it will find its way out of you as a storyteller."

Thank you for the encouragement, it means a lot to me.

Have a lovely week:-) Nadie
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Post by JamesN. » Mon Oct 13, 2014 6:56 pm

NadieAchak wrote:Thank you James for a warm welcome back. I've been busy writing my memoir. I joined Scribeophile for critiques before sending my book to an editor. I'm back because this is where it all began for me, Joseph Campbell. Thanks for the links - very helpful, so I'll spend the day reading them. I purchased Chris Vogler's book on Kindle: MEMO FROM THE STORY DEPARTMENT: Secrets of Structure and Character. $16.79 on Kindle is a bit much, but I'm desperate :D

It weren't for this marvelous man, Joseph Campbell, I would not have understood my life - all the twist and turns. The critters are requesting more details about my childhood, which I hadn't plan to share with my girls. I mostly hinted at the bad times. Everyone's encouraging me to publish, but I'm hesitant. However, I do plan to have it bound professionally. I will continue to meditate on publishing. I think it's going to be a yes, since my girls, brothers, and 90 year old aunt are not concerned about exposing my parents' abuse, which has turned into a book in itself.


I love Joseph's two books: Fire in the Mind and The Hero's Journey. I have ALL of his books and the videos with Bill Moyer, which are priceless.

Thank you for timely response and, more importantly, the links, which held a nugget: Chris Volger's book. Have a lovely week and God speed :)
Hey Nadie; you are certainly most welcome and glad you to see you back. I too share your special feelings about Joseph Campbell's work and what it has brought to my life.

Several things occur to me from your posts; although whatever help they may provide will of course depend upon their relevance to your particular situation. One is if you have not already done so I would take a moment to scan through some of these various threads in these forums since a lot of time has passed since you were last here. I know there are a lot of them but there may be some areas that you might connect with concerning your interests for this project;. Perhaps you have already done so but I thought I would mention it anyway. ( I'll keep my eye out as well. :wink: )

Also I would recommend the " Story " thread Clemsy has posted in the 1,000 Faces forum. http://www.jcf.org/new/forum/viewtopic.php?t=4960 I think what he said to you about your own individual " narrative " is very important for more than just one reason. This is " your voice " that is trying to emerge; and it is " your story " that is trying to present it's " message " from your own experience; not only to others; but just as important " to yourself "; ( if that makes sense ). IMHO I think that is a critical component that is often overlooked; perhaps even somewhat denied by folks many times in the way a memoir is thought of and approached.

In our experience as human beings I think we often miss that the fact that ( in trying to do for others ) in what we choose to reveal or pass on we may miss that special part of the deeper dimensions of our own life that we lived; and it is within this cathartic process of the reliving or the telling of it that not only is some of it's deeper meanings evoked and transferred; but the true " authenticity " of one's own voice, experience, and charactor is made known. And in passing on this sense of our deeper " self " and experiences there is also a profound depth of " who we were " that may also be transmitted to those that we love and to others who may come after whom we may never know that touches them and lives on. ( So if I might humbly suggest without sounding too oblivious to your efforts thus far; this is " your story - told in your voice - from your own experiences "; and to me that would be the " single " most important element to remember while putting it together and taking into consideration any requests from others. ( Of course you may already be aware of all this; I'm just adding it as an afterthought. :wink: )

We all have something of value to leave behind as our legacy; it is our gift to the world that we were here. And it's message as Joseph Campbell suggests is not only that we lived in the " experience of life's rapture "; ( both the good and the bad ); but that we have each tried in our own way to seek an individual destiny in " The Call " of our own " Life's Adventure " to bring forth that which is representative in a sense of ( who we were meant to be ). And it is within that knowledge that is gained within those efforts towards our own identity and self-understanding that a path is revealed for others to follow as they continue on in their own struggles, to find their own way in the fulfillment of their own lives, that is it's greatest gift left behind as a signpost of life's privilege of existence.

Best of luck in your quest. :)



( I would however like to add one small addendum here concerning Clemsy's second post with which I think fits really well concerning whatever advice you have previously been offered about " which " Nadie tells your story. People have all kinds of well intentioned suggestions and they may not be what you necessarily need. As he says your " storyteller " will emerge I think given a little time to mature within the process. ):
And, Nadie, I would like to add that when composing your own memoir, your own hero's journey, the bottom line is to tell your story. I don't know about "unreconstituted" and "self-designed" selves. We are who we are in the moment we exist, and in the end if one is tell the story of one's life, then one must be a storyteller.



In the end take out all the thoughtful recommendations from others about what your voice should or should not be and ask yourself this: " Does my story resonant with me; does it speak in " my " voice; and does it get across what I'm trying to convey? " This should I think line up with what Clemsy is saying and take you to where you need to go. ( IMHO of course. ) :)
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Post by NadieAchak » Mon Oct 13, 2014 11:47 pm

Good Lord James!!! What you just wrote is packed with knowledge and wisdom. I've printed it so I can absorb all the nuggets you've given me. I know you're a modest person, but I really must tell you what impact your post has made on me. :D

I remember Clemsy. He was so very helpful with a message I posted just before I started writing my book. He, too, is a lovely young man - full of knowledge and wisdom as well. I have clicked on his link so I can read this very important thread.

James, I can't express with words how much your sincere thoughts and suggestions have touched me. I now feel I can do this. :D

Now that I'm back, by divine guidance, I most certainly will be reading many threads. Now retired, I have lots of time.
This is " your voice " that is trying to emerge; and it is " your story " that is trying to present it's " message " from your own experience; not only to others; but just as important " to yourself "; ( if that makes sense ).
Yes, the above makes sense - finding MY voice!
In our experience as human beings I think we often miss that the fact that ( in trying to do for others ) in what we choose to reveal or pass on we may miss that special part of the deeper dimensions of our own life that we lived; and it is within this cathartic process of the reliving or the telling of it that not only is some of it's deeper meanings evoked and transferred; but the true " authenticity " of one's own voice, experience, and character is made known.

James, this is where I've gone missed the boat. I have been writing for others and, in turn, squelched my authentic voice.
And in passing on this sense of our deeper " self " and experiences there is also a profound depth of " who we were " that may also be transmitted to those that we love and to others who may come after whom we may never know that touches them and lives on.

My life story is so very important to my daughter/granddaughters. They have been hounding me for years to complete it. I've been trying to write it for them - this is where I've missed the mark. I do want to pass them my story, not what I think they'd like to have. I owe it to them to tell my story. Yes, I can make it flowery, as they say, but I'm not telling my true story and how I journeyed through the events of my life. I can't remember who said, you may not intend to publish, but your descendants might do it. I thought horror of horrors. I have to write MY story, not how I "think" it should be written.
it is our gift to the world that we were here. And it's message as Joseph Campbell suggests is not only that we lived in the " experience of life's rapture "; ( both the good and the bad ); but that we have each tried in our own way to seek an individual destiny in " The Call " of our own " Life's Adventure " to bring forth that which is representative in a sense of ( who we were meant to be ). And it is within that knowledge that is gained within those efforts towards our own identity and self-understanding that a path is revealed for others to follow as they continue on in their own struggles, to find their own way in the fulfillment of their own lives, that is it's greatest gift left behind as a signpost of life's privilege of existence.

James, this is so profound that I must sit and meditate on it . . . let it truly sink in. You are a blessing, just as Clemsy.

Thank you for responding to my dilemma - all is well now. :)

I am heading to Clemsy's thread and on to others, thanks to you to wonderful guys.

Have a lovely week to the both of you. :D

P.S. Sorry, not familiar with the use of quotes, but I know you can figure it out.
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Post by JamesN. » Tue Oct 14, 2014 3:12 am

Nadie your kind reply is truly one of the most touching and meaningful I have ever received on these forums. Please know that if I have been of any assistance I assure you that it is directly related to the patient and kind support and shared knowledge of my fellow associates here on these forums; without which I would still be stumbling around within my own darkness - for we are all in this together; right? ( No one enjoys the heartache and suffering of emotional confusion; we've all been there; right? ) I only received and returned with the same spirit of gratitude what was first given to me; and I most certainly am grateful if given the opportunity to play some small part in helping someone else. ) This place for me has been a lighthouse; and it is because of the unfailing commitment of it's staff and the continued shared sense of community of this fellowship of associates that makes this such a very special place to be a part of. Of course we are human here and being that are not perfect. But in the larger scheme of things I just simply don't know what I would do without this place. ( And by the way; we so very glad to have you back among us. )

Another thread I might mention that has been very helpful for me in the service of my own individual journey if it interests you I would also " very " highly recommend is moderator Cindy's: " Jung in the Weeds " material on the 1,000 Faces forum. This has been extraordinarily helpful for me personally in sorting out a lot of the internal psychological issues that we all have to deal with at some point in our lives; but you must judge for yourself if this is something that appeals to you and want to pursue. There are other threads of course that deal with specific areas as you remember from the old days; and some may be more relevant to certain types of interests on any given topic; that's not changed; there is just a lot more of them with some dormant some not.

Although I'm certainly no English teacher like Clemsy; from what have I read from your posts it sounds to me like you are more than ready to take on this project of yours. As I recall there is a saying that goes: " For everything there is a season "; and it sounds like this is yours; yes? And if I may be allowed I'm sure folks here on the forums will be happy to assist with whatever support they can offer. ( I'll try to keep on the lookout for other threads of information that might be helpful as I mentioned before. ) Take some time as you are getting organized and collecting your thoughts and I'll bet you some of this will start falling into place.

There is a wonderful quote of Joe's I came across lately I have been trying to meditate on in " Pathways to Bliss "; page 94: ( " So first you must find in yourself that which moves you. Of course, it will move you on the level of a human being. And it should move you in a way appropriate to your stage of life. You must learn to know what the archetype of your stage of life is and live it. " ) This is one I'm trying to work on for myself at the moment as I am trying to figure out my next step these days; I'll bet you have a favorite quote or two yourself that you like to think about once in awhile that might be helpful.

Nadie please accept my sincere gratitude for your deeply moving and heartwarming expression of kindness. It's beautifully poignant sentiments just made my day! :D

( Much luck with your journey. )

Cheers and welcome back.

__________________________________


Nadie I made a slight edit from my previous recommended threads and took out " Following the Marga "; and left in Cindy's " Jung in the Weeds " thread since you are already well on your way in starting your project. Clemsy's advice of finding " your storyteller " I think is really better suited for your particular situation at the moment.

If you have not already been I might suggest a trip to the Foundation's bookstore where there is a wealth of material located should you find you are wondering about further resources to help supplement your ideas; along with a trip to your local library which of course is always a good standby.

( Here is a helpful guide along with a link from the homepage to it's contents that you may find of use. ):


One book that might be of assistance for you at some point is Sam Keene's " Your Mythic Journey " and is located here. He was a friend of Joseph's and uses his themes in focusing on writing, storytelling, and how it relates to personal narrative. But for now I would just start from where you are and see what emerges. You may not necessarily need any help since you are writing out of your own personal experience and already have a voice developing in the process from your earlier efforts. At any rate a perusal may give you some extra ideas that may be of help.

http://www.jcf.org/new/index.php?categoryid=123

Reading About Myth

Joseph Campbell observed that one of the best ways to delve deep into any subject is to find an author whose work touches you and read the books that writer read. But, as noted in a recent email to JCF, for those moved by Campbell's own work it's a tedious task to search through the footnotes and bibliographies of every book he's written.

Other correspondents ask about the state of mythology in the post-Campbell era: who are the scholars and authors contributing to the field today, and where can their work be found?

One place to seek the answers is JCF's online bookstore. Here you'll find not only all of Joseph Campbell's titles, but also books by scholars who influenced Campbell, authors Campbell cited, contemporary contributions to the field of mythology aimed at general and academic audiences, and much more.

JCF has added sections on Islamic Studies and Native American Studies under the Contemporary Voices category, and a section on "The Fairy Tale" in the Popular Voices category (you can also find academic studies of folklore and fairy tales under Contemporary Voices). We've added several titles to many of the other categories as well.

("The Fairy Tale" section leads off with Lucy Cooper's worthy The Element Encyclopedia of Fairies, pictured here. This work, published in the United Kingdom on August 28, will soon be available through to United States residents through the JCF Bookstore—but for now, those who live in England, Scotland, Wales, and the Emerald Isle can click on this image to order Ms. Cooper's book at Amazon UK).

After clicking on the link to the JCF Bookstore, the menu on the right of each page lists 20 separate categories—"Campbell's Reading List," "Sacred Voices," "Shapers of the Field," etc.—many with multiple subcategories (e.g. "Ritual Studies," "Feminine Images in Myth," "Shamanism," and more, collected under the broad category of "Contemporary Voices"). This can seem confusing to first-time visitors. Though once you click on a category in the list you'll find its description at the top of the page, feel free to scroll though the brief rundown below for a sense of what each category contains:
1.Sacred Voices – collections of myths, folklore, and fairy tales from around the globe (the category at the top of the list will change from time to time).
2.Campbell's Published Works
3.Campbell's Reading List – titles Campbell assigned in his mythology course at Sarah Lawrence
4.Edited by Joseph Campbell – includes the brilliant Heinrich Zimmer volumes Campbell completed after Zimmer's untimely passing
5.E-Books (those available through Kindle)
6.Video on Demand (streaming through Amazon)
7.DVDs – Campbell lectures and interviews, including the Power of Myth
8.Recorded Lectures – physical CDs now only available through third-party sellers (though all these lectures and more can be downloaded from JCF in our Contributions area)
9.About Joseph Campbell – books that focus on aspects of Campbell's personal history, including interviews, journal excerpts, and an extensive biography.
10.Sources & Inspirations – authors who served as major inspirations in the development of Campbell's own thought
11.Shapers of the Field – anthropologists, archaeologists, and classical scholars in the late 19th and early 20th centuries who paved the way for the field of mythological studies.
12.Campbell References – authors and scholars Campbell frequently cited in his work.
13.Colleagues, Companions, and Kindred Spirits – writings by colleagues and personal friends of Campbell (18 individuals, from Alan Watts to James Hillman, each with their own section in the drop-down menu when you click on this category)
14.JCF Fellows – writings and performances of individuals selected by the Foundation who have demonstrated in their work, and in their lives, a commitment to furthering Campbell's vision
15.Contemporary Voices – sixty general works by contemporary scholars on mythological studies and related academic fields, plus another hundred titles collected under specific subjects in the drop-down menu when you click on this category.
16.Popular Voices – works that have broad popular appeal, written with the layperson in mind. Forty-five works of a general nature are on the main pages, with another one hundred twenty volumes divided among specific subjects in the drop-down menu when you click on this category.
17.Dictionaries of Symbolism & Word Etymology – reference works on symbols and word origins. – invaluable tools for myth scholars.
18.Mythological Resources – titles that have been nominated by JCF Associates.
19.RoundTable Selections – volumes in this category have been featured at meetings of one or more of JCF's 50 different local Mythological RoundTable® groups.
20.Criticism – academic works that evaluate Campbell's contributions to the field of comparative mythology.


If you begin your Amazon shopping in our online store (which is powered by Amazon), then JCF receives 5% of everything you place in your Amazon cart that you purchase the next 24 hours—even if not from our store, or not even a book (JCF has received fees on items from lawnmowers to computers—not sure if that's intentional, but we are grateful!).

However, should you prefer a local brick-and-mortar store, or one of Amazon's online competitors, browsing the selections in the JCF bookstore first can still be of value in helping you decide what to purchase through other outlets.
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Post by NadieAchak » Tue Oct 14, 2014 6:07 pm

James, you have been a light at the end of a dark tunnel. Thank you for your spirit of gratitude. The gift passed has been passed to me; God willing, I will have an opportunity to do the same.

I have spent the whole day on JCF site, and I have missed it. There is so much knowledge and wisdom here that you need only to sit and read. Thank you for all your great suggestions.

I'll take a look at "Jung in the Weeds" - sounds intriguing and up my alley.

Thanks for informing about Amazon. I purchase most of my books from them on kindle, but I actually prefer paper books:-). I'll buy my books now through the JCF site. I have a few of Keen's books - love him, but I don't have his The Mythic Journey, so I'll purchase it today. He's a very knowledgeable man with much wisdom.

Thank you for the instructions on how to use the book site. When I visited it, it was a bit confusing, but now I have directions:-)

James keep up the great work, you're very good at what you do. You have no idea how much you have helped me thus far. I'll be reading/studying all you've given me for weeks to come. I'll keep you posted as to how I'm doing.

I shared with my writing group about my frustration, and how I turned to JCF. Guess what? I think you'll have a few new members. One young lady even asked who is Joseph Campbell. I simply gave them the website and told them to check it out for themselves. It still amazes me how many people who have never heard of this great man.

James, I bow and thank you from the bottom of my heart for all the time you've spent in providing all the information in this post. I've saved it all and printed, so I don't lose track of yours and others knowledge and wisdom.

Have a lovely day, Nadie
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Post by JamesN. » Tue Oct 14, 2014 11:46 pm

Nadie you are so very thoughtful for sharing such generous and heartfelt sentiments and I most assuredly will treasure them. As I mentioned before I am grateful to have been of service. I am just an associate and not a moderator just so you know; and whatever I have provided as information may not always be totally accurate but as close as I know to be. As I said earlier I have had difficulties of my own over the years here on the forums; and I am sure there will be more for the journey never ends and always continues on with both good and not so good times ahead; that's what life is as I'm sure you know. Others have helped me and truly it was a treat to do something that may have benefited you; for anyone knows who has been there; it's just not much fun is it? From your post it seems that you are off and running. ( Splendid! 8) )

It sounds like you've already been getting reacquainted with the place and that's excellent; I think you'll find both new and old areas to investigate you as you continue on with your interests. Also you may discover the level of activity comes and goes a little less now than in days of yore; but the things I seek for why I come here still remain and that's what's important to me.

I might also mention our moderator Cindy has been such a great help with so many things concerning the forums that I'm sure you will enjoy getting to know her; delightful, sharp as a tack, and a lot of fun too. She and Clemsy keep things running pretty smoothly here.

Very cool you have a writing group; hopefully that will provide insight and support for some of your ideas as you progress. ( I'm sure you know this terrain as to what you do or do not want to share concerning your story with them; as long as there is respect and things are not too personal or critically invasive that's wonderful. Any encouragement and growth with shared interests is a great thing if that is what you are enjoying. ) Incidentally Clemsy teaches writing as a major component for his classes; and " The Hero's Journey " is a central theme within the format he uses as I understand it; but I'm not completely sure how his situation works concerning that. Be sure and check out his " Dream Class " thread here: http://www.jcf.org/new/forum/viewtopic.php?t=4056

I'll try and to keep an eye out for anything I think might be helpful and will look forward to sharing thoughts on the boards with you. Again thank you so very much for your deeply moving expressions of gratitude. The glow of their warm most certainly brought sunshine to a somewhat damp and gloomy day.


All the best to you. :D
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Post by NadieAchak » Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:02 pm

Hi James. Well, I'm well on my way in rewriting my chapters and already getting praise.

As for Clemsy and Cindy (our moderator), I appreciate them as well. Clemsy reached out to me years ago and helped me so much with dilemma at the time, as well as Tree Hugger - I don't know if she's still here or not.

James, I'm not sure I understand the following your wrote in parenthesis. If it's what I think, please rest assured I have not broken any breaches with JCF with my writing group. None of the conversations shared in this thread has been discussed with them. The only sharing was of how I found my way back to my story through JC's work at his site. I want to emphasize this - my hubby was a detective for over 30 years, so I know the importance of keeping my mouth shut:-). I'm almost seventy, and I've matured through Campbell's writings, along with Jung and Hillman. Please do not be concerned that I might have a wagging tongue. No breach has been broken with JCF. Most in my group have never heard of JC, so I gave them the website to view and learn for themselves. All that said, if this was not what the following is about, at least you know that I understand the rules/guidelines.

( I'm sure you know this terrain as to what you do or do not want to share concerning your story with them; as long as there is respect and things are not too personal or critically invasive that's wonderful. Any encouragement and growth with shared interests is a great thing if that is what you are enjoying)

I am looking forward to discussing my work more with Clemsy and Cindy about certain areas in another thread. James, your sincere earnest in helping me means much to me. You have been right on target in your thoughts and suggestions. I hope our paths will pass again in another thread:-) Blessing, Nadie
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Post by Cindy B. » Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:35 pm

Hi, Nadie, it's nice to meet you. :)

And I just want to offer my two cents regarding your writing--Writer's Rule No. 1: Always write for yourself. (Well, it's among the top ten rules, anyway. :P )

Best of luck with your project!
If the path before you is clear, you’re probably on someone else’s. --Jung
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Post by JamesN. » Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:36 pm

James, I'm not sure I understand the following your wrote in parenthesis. If it's what I think, please rest assured I have not broken any breaches with JCF with my writing group. None of the conversations shared in this thread has been discussed with them. The only sharing was of how I found my way back to my story through JC's work at his site. I want to emphasize this - my hubby was a detective for over 30 years, so I know the importance of keeping my mouth shut:-). I'm almost seventy, and I've matured through Campbell's writings, along with Jung and Hillman. Please do not be concerned that I might have a wagging tongue. No breach has been broken with JCF. Most in my group have never heard of JC, so I gave them the website to view and learn for themselves. All that said, if this was not what the following is about, at least you know that I understand the rules/guidelines.

( I'm sure you know this terrain as to what you do or do not want to share concerning your story with them; as long as there is respect and things are not too personal or critically invasive that's wonderful. Any encouragement and growth with shared interests is a great thing if that is what you are enjoying)
Hey Nadie. As to the above my apologies if I was somewhat nebulous. I was not referring to the JCF at all. I just meant concerning your own private thoughts and feelings being open to anyone else's criticisms that's all. It's very easy to be wounded by someone's well intentioned suggestions, much less being open to non well-intention ego's. But it sounds like you know what you are doing and on top of that too; so I won't continue on about that.

Cool that you are already in gear and I certainly wish you well in these endeavors.

Much luck.

Cheers
:)
What do I know? - Michael de Montaigne
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Post by Cindy B. » Wed Oct 15, 2014 6:14 pm

Just so you know, James, a writer's group such as Nadie's is only concerned with the art and craft of writing and not with personal issues giving rise to the work. :)
If the path before you is clear, you’re probably on someone else’s. --Jung
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