New to Joseph Campbell

Who was Joseph Campbell? What is a myth? What does "Follow Your Bliss" mean? If you are new to the work of Joseph Campbell, this forum is a good place to start.

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ebh
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Post by ebh » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

Bought the DVD set The Power of Myth and loved it. Started reading American Indian Myths and Legends (easier to read than Tales of the North American Indians). Professor from local university spoke at my son's hs graduation and suggested that the graduates follow their bliss. Almost fell off the bleachers!
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Post by Martin_Weyers » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

Welcome, ebh! The suggestion to follow one's bliss is maybe the most subtle form of revolution that has ever taken place on earth. We need that after all those bloody subversions!

I hope one day you will share with us what you've learned from those American Indian myths and legends!

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Post by Robertthecampbellstudent » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

Welcome

You probaly know by now that american indian myths were what got joe hooked as a kid. He discovered them at the musuem of natural history in new york city and the modern face society has forever been changed...

The greek myths were what got me hooked as a kid. What was it for you?
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Post by IcedGoddess » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

I remember at the age of about 15, with not much of any religious background, (supposedly lutheran--the "laid back" Christians)I would spend nights on the phone with a cousin about 3 years older than me. We would read the bible, NIV version, every night for 3 to 4 hours before going to bed. She read to find comfort, I read to find reason. She eventually converted to "born again baptist", and I into something completely different. I went way into the "dark" side, what some in here have refered to as the occult-version of the "left-hand path" Used to hang out in cemetaries, well one cemetary, and did lots of "rituals", always studying and practicing on my own. I have never known anyone who felt the way I did about the world. Or about the Bible. Then by 17-18 I was in a relationship with a man and his 2 year old daughter, I didn't feel my current practices were very appropriate for a "good mother and wife". Everything was put on the back burner. During those years I probably had more difficulty in my life than I would have, had I continued to study. It wasn't until 8 years later that I left that relationship, and began my studies again, this time it was Mark Twain, his writings about the religion he was raised in, and his wife was a member of, were so unbelievably similar to the thoughts I had formed in my teens. I read everything he wrote on the subject. Along with his writings on men and women. It was his writings that turned me from the "occult" practices, into the real and now. (odd side note: the bible sent me towards the dark sciences, whereas Clemens brought me out of them.) Then a few years ago I watched "The Power of Myth" on PBS. I was literaly FLOORED by what JC said in that program. Someone respected and educated and experienced, was on public television sharing with the world MY ideas! I was so overjoyed to see him and watch him. As he so fluently recited the similar stories of other religions and comparison stories in the bible. How he brought it all together as one, all the religions not facts, but myths. Something I had felt was true so many years before, and to hear him confirm these thoughts, out loud and to millions upon millions of people. That was the shock that got me interested in the rest of Campbell's works, and though he may not have wanted the title of "Guru" he has certainly been mine.

And as for re-incarnation, I believe we have all made sure that Joseph Campbell is re-incarnated every day, in our thoughts and words.

IcedGoddess<br>A.K.A. Dianne Parsons<br>http://castleserpents.com<br>http://icedgoddess.com<br>"You cannot depend on your Judgement, when your Imagination is out of Focus."<br>Sam Clemens
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Post by Robertthecampbellstudent » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

pretty cool followup Icegoddess
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Post by ebh » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

Met a Native American man about 8 years ago. He had a presence about him. Almost an aura that until recently, I hadn't really analyzed. Native American myths and legends interest me, because of the relationship of man and his surroundings- so harmonious and so simple. I too, went through the different 'religious' quests, and things like witchcraft to try to understand...not until a very good friend introduced me to Joseph Campbell did it all make sense.
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Post by Robertthecampbellstudent » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

I was just clean and sober and my first sponsor was a native amaerican.

We did pipe ceremonies and sweatlodges and went to pow wows to see him in his traditional garb and i got to dance withthem and listen to those wonderful drums.

It was one of the top ten experiences of my life.
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Post by Robertthecampbellstudent » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

Here are two other top ten experiences of my life:

I was in a mens group. At the end of the weekend there were two hundred of us all dancinfg around naked like a bunch of savages.

Once when I was hurt in love by a girl, I went way out into the woods in the midddle of the night and danced round and round a huge bonfire by myself listening to a black sabbath song over and over and over again.

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Post by Billeen » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

ebh, the only crappy thing about Campbell that I can think of, is now you are always going to know how the story goes. It makes for jaded movie watching.

Robert, dude, I once bought Alanis Morisette's Jagged Little Pill album for myself on Valentine's day. I know the feeling.
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Post by bodhibliss » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

On 2006-06-12 13:01, Billeen wrote:
ebh, the only crappy thing about Campbell that I can think of, is now you are always going to know how the story goes. It makes for jaded movie watching.
This makes me chuckle as i remember my own experience in the first year or so after reading The Hero with a Thousand Faces - for the next year i ruined movie after movie for friends by telling them in advance what was going to happen next ...

Eventually (after noticing nobody seemed to want to go to the movies with me anymore), i learned the value of surrendering to the moment and enjoying how the film unfolds, rather than anticipating what will happen next - appreciating the artistry, if you will

... though i'm still jaded when they do a poor job of it (e.g., the first two flicks of the most recent Star Wars cycle).

Though we know the pattern, what makes the experience enjoyable for me is whether or not the artists involved (writers, directors, actors, etc.) are able to foster a genuine sense of participation mystique, where i'm able to forget myself and just wallow in the moment ...

Does that make me an elitist?

Probably ... but i guess i'll just have to live with that ...

namaste
bodhibliss


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Post by A J » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

On 2006-06-14 14:35, Bodhi_Bliss wrote:
On 2006-06-12 13:01, Billeen wrote:
ebh, the only crappy thing about Campbell that I can think of, is now you are always going to know how the story goes. It makes for jaded movie watching.
This makes me chuckle as i remember my own experience in the first year or so after reading The Hero with a Thousand Faces - for the next year i ruined movie after movie for friends by telling them in advance what was going to happen next ...
This would probably fit better under "Awakening..." but I can't help but chuckle, too. I taught "The Hero Cycle" from Hero with a Thousand Faces in my high school literature classes. My students were constantly regaling me with the plots of movies they had recently seen, pointing out the steps of the cycle. I learned that just because a story follows the hero's plot structure doesn't mean it's a great story - at least not in my students' retelling.

AJ
"Sacred space and sacred time and something joyous to do is all we need. Almost anything then becomes a continuous and increasing joy."

A Joseph Campbell Companion: Reflections on the Art of Living
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Post by Clemsy » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

AJ and Bodhi,

I just finished a mythology unit with my 7th graders, culminating in the hero quest. I'll be posting somewhat of what we did up in Awakenings when I have some time...

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Post by Billeen » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

It's kind of like getting Dad a fancy new DeWalt power drill for Father's Day. Suddenly there isn't a project that doesn't require its use. Campbell is a tool we can use for everything.
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Post by amma khema » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

Hi! i'm new to the discussion. watching The Power of Myth was what got me hooked on JC. He was speaking my experience.What a liberating affirmation. As a child, i always loved watching programs that covered cultural anthropology, world religions, etc... . Now, I have a new found interest in Native American myth, healing, shamanic journeying. Currently reading "The Buddha in Redface " which dovetails with my Buddhism. Any suggestions on books relating to these topics? Or the best way to begin a committed study of JC's life works?

with metta, laura
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Post by ShantiSong » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

Welcome Amma,

By my calculation Joseph Campbell is the author of twenty three books. One he co-authored and about ten or so were edited by someone else.

Books Written by Joseph Campbell

1.) Skeleton Key to Finnegans Wake; Joseph Campbell and Henry Morton Robinson, (1944)
2.) The Hero with a Thousand Faces (1949)
3.) The Flight of the Wild Gander: Explorations in the Mythological Dimension (1951)
4.) The Masks of God; Volume 1, Primitive Mythology (1959)
5.) The Masks of God; Volume 2, Oriental Mythology (1962)
6.) The Masks of God; Volume 3, Occidental Mythology (1964)
7.) The Masks of God; Volume 4, Creative Mythology (1968)
8.) Myths to Live By (1972)
9.) The Mythic Image (1974)
10.) The Inner Reaches of Outer Space: Metaphor As Myth and As Religion (1986)
11.) Historical Atlas of World Mythology Volume I: The Way of Animal Powers; Part 1 (1988)
12.) Historical Atlas of World Mythology Volume I: The Way of Animal Powers; Part 2 (1988)
13.) Historical Atlas of World Mythology Volume II: The Way of the Seeded Earth; Part 1 (1988)
14.) Historical Atlas of World Mythology Volume II: The Way of the Seeded Earth; Part 2 (1989)
15.) Historical Atlas of World Mythology Volume II: The Way of the Seeded Earth; Part 3 (1989)
16.) A Joseph Campbell Companion: Reflections on the Art of Living; (Edited by Diane K. Osbon) (1991)
17.) Mythic Worlds, Modern Words: On the Art of James Joyce; (Edited by Edmund L. Epstein) (1993)
18.) The Mythic Dimension: Selected Essays (1959-1987) (Edited by Anthony Van Couvering) (1993)
19.) Baksheesh & Brahman: Indian Journals (1954-1955) (Edited by Robin/Stephen Larsen & Anthony Van Couvering) (1995)
20.) Thou Art That: Transforming Religious Metaphor (Edited by Eugene Kennedy) (2001)
21.) Sake & Satori (Edited by David Kudler) (2002)
22.) Myths of Light: Eastern Metaphors of the Eternal (Edited by David Kudler) (2003)
23.) Pathways to Bliss: (Edited by David Kudler) (2004)

But where to start. That will depend on what it is you like most about Campbell and how ambitious a reader you are. I would read these nine books first in this order.

1.) Myths of Light: Eastern Metaphors of the Eternal (Edited by David Kudler) (2003)
2.) Thou Art That: Transforming Religious Metaphor (Edited by Eugene Kennedy) (2001)
3.) The Hero with a Thousand Faces (1949)
4.) The Flight of the Wild Gander: Explorations in the Mythological Dimension (1951)
5.) The Masks of God; Volume 1, Primitive Mythology (1959)
6.) The Masks of God; Volume 2, Oriental Mythology (1962)
7.) Myths to Live By (1972)
8.) The Mythic Image (1974)
9.) The Inner Reaches of Outer Space: Metaphor As Myth and As Religion (1986)

But you must hear Joseph Campbell speak to get the full effect of his teaching. So - you also should listen to these nine audio books.

Joseph Campbell Audio

1.) The Wisdom of Joseph Campbell (With Michael Toms) (1997)
2.) Myth and Metaphor in Society (With Jamake Highwater) (2002)
3.) The Way of Art (1990)
4.) Joseph Campbell Audio Collection; Volume 1:Mythology and the Individual (1997)
5.) Joseph Campbell Audio Collection; Volume 2:The Inward Journey
6.) Joseph Campbell Audio Collection; Volume 3:The Eastern Way
7.) Joseph Campbell Audio Collection; Volume 4:Man and Myth
8.) Joseph Campbell Audio Collection; Volume 5: The Western Quest
9.) Joseph Campbell Audio Collection; Volume 6:The Myths and Masks of God

Then, watch ten hours of Joseph Campbell lectures on the Mythos series.

Joseph Campbell Video

1.) Mythos; The Shaping of Our Mythic Tradition (1990)
2.) Mythos; The Shaping of the Eastern Tradition (1990)

Then, read this lecture in print unless you can find the video somewhere.

Joseph Campbell Lectures in Print

1.) Transformations of Myth through Time (1990)

Then, read these two dialogs with Joseph Campbell.

Interviews with Joseph Campbell in Print

1.) The Hero's Journey: Interview with Stuart I. Brown (1990)
2.) An Open Life: Interview with Michael Toms (1989)

And that’s it! That’s only 23 items in all.

To tell you the truth, I envy you Amma. I wish I was reading these books and hearing Joseph Campbell for the first time. <IMG SRC="/forum/images/smiles/icon_frown.gif">

Shanti







<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: ShantiSong on 2006-08-07 04:05 ]</font>
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