What exactly is meant by transcendence?

Who was Joseph Campbell? What is a myth? What does "Follow Your Bliss" mean? If you are new to the work of Joseph Campbell, this forum is a good place to start.

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CarmelaBear
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Post by CarmelaBear » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

On 2003-09-10 02:06, Joe the Dragon wrote:

If all we are to do is meditate silently and transcend into infinite than why do anything at all? What about progress? Technology? Challenge? Work? and Video Games?

If nothing i do will last why do anything at all? Why not just sit under the bodhi tree and wait to sink back into the ground from which i came?
Transcendence is always relative to the immanent. That's the key. A picture is immanent. We can see it and imagine it being alive. As a mythic or archetypal symbol, the picture transcends our understanding of what is accessible to our senses.

Picture a dragon. It's a snake, which Campbell calls "a travelling alimentary canal", and the dragon wings give the snake the ability to break the bounds of earth's gravity, flying and breathing fire like a flame-thrower.

Our experience of the immanent is the door to the transcendent. We live always in one, like a snake, unable to break the bounds of earth's pull. Then, in our imaginations, we sprout wings! We imagine something good or we find something wonderful or we make something that transports us out of ourselves and our mundane lives and eureka! We find a realm of experience that transcends that which we first saw or heard or felt.

Without the requirements of our stomachs, without the needs of our hearts and minds, without the problems and challenges that make living such a complicated and horrifically short ride, without suffering in some form, there could be no need or experience of the transcendent. We have to transcend SOMETHING. So, you put your eyes on the prize and your nose to the grindstone, and Dragon, you will surely find an infinity so beautiful and good that you won't need any more answers to anything. It will all make sense. You will begin to guide and teach.

In essence, there is transcendent order in the chaos of immanent life, but you have to experience that chaotic jumble for yourself to find the sublime order there. You can find it under a bodhi tree, but that's been done. Each has his/her own path. Myths show us the way, and we all find transcendence, if it doesn't find us first. :wink:

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<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: CaveBear on 2004-09-23 18:36 ]</font>
myke00
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Post by myke00 » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

It seems that the state of transendence is overshadowed by the concept of satori. (please pardon my spelling, and lack of reading the entire of this thread.) The myths ring true, the work of our hero is part and parcel of the becoming. It seems to me that we must take the travails of the heroes as a template to our becoming.
creekmary
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Post by creekmary » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:22 am

"If nothing i do will last why do anything at all?"

I guess for the adventure of living. I guess it's supposed to be an adventure. Maintaining that cosmic over-view might help with transcending the adventures that suck, like my friend's funeral last week for his 17 year old daughter. She was their only child and a month away from her first baby. She was the same age as my son. My mom picked them both up from school every day when they were small. I don't think I could be that transcendent, but trying to understand this might help -

"The energies of the Universe are infinte. I am of the energies of the universe, therefore i too am infinite.

Worlds rise and fall in infinite cycles. All temporal things are passing, but the energy of the universe is eternal. Thus death shall not be feared and material things shall not be coveted."

Susan
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