Dream Journaling

Joseph Campbell formulated what became his most quoted dictum, "Follow your bliss" in the decade before his death. Join this conversation to explore this idea and share stories.

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Ravager77
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Dream Journaling

Post by Ravager77 » Sat Jun 26, 2010 3:24 pm

This is something I began to do a long time ago, and has served to help me understand my subconcious and daily thoughts to some extent. I keep a running journal on all my dreams from day to day as much as possible. Sometimes, of course, I forget them and I cannot record the dream. Then also, sometimes they're vague or just plain in patches of thought. However, when I do record them the moment I wake up, they are as clear as I am able to remember.
I've had dreams of people, and they pop up in reality. I've dreamt of things happening in my religion and that becomes a focus. Needless to say, the subconcious appears to support the conscious thought. I know Campbell has said, "the world of dreams is our private myth". It would appear true on many levels. However, my dreams are so varied and different it is very hard to pin down any one main idea or point.
However, I do recommend this idea of dream journaling as often as one is able to. It gives me a sense of direction with my thoughts and ideas. I hope this helps someone out there looking to figure out their direction. :)
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Post by Neoplato » Sat Jun 26, 2010 11:02 pm

Hi Ravager77,

I learned a lot from my dream journel, but I haven't kept it up in awhile. Once I began to research the symbolic meanings of the images, things became much clearer. Then I was able to evaluate my dreams after future events took place. In hindsight, the sybolic images of the dreams proved to be a warning to me.

It was like experiencing what I had read in Jung. :shock:
Infinite moment, grants freedom of winter death, allows life to dawn.
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Post by Remember » Wed Aug 04, 2010 2:51 pm

I too keep a daily dream journal. For me it is essential to pay attention to the messages from the unconscious. Three good ways I've found to get more from my dreams is to (1) work with a Jungian analyst, (2) form a regular dream group with others to share and get feedback on how we experience each others dreams, and (3) follow the methods outlined in the book "Inner Work: Using Dreams and Active Imagination for Personal Growth" by Robert A. Johnson
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Post by Neoplato » Wed Aug 04, 2010 3:52 pm

Hi Remember,

The dream journal helped me notice that I was actually having reoccurring dreams based on the symbolism and images.

For example, I never realized how many times I dreamed about traveling and staying at hotels. I interpret this as "being on a journey with no permanent residence" which to me is a reminder of the Buddhist notion of the impermanence of all things. 8)
Infinite moment, grants freedom of winter death, allows life to dawn.
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Post by Transom » Wed Aug 04, 2010 8:29 pm

Not sure if there is any correlation in it, but whenever I significantly alter my diet in the course of a day, i.e. eat a whole box of oreos, maybe have a bit too much wine, or spend the day fasting, my dreams are strange indeed. I don't know if the influx of sugar, alcohol, or few nutrients at all has any effect...but I am inclined to think that it does. After all, consciousness extends to the body and its organs as much as it lives in 'the mind'.

My rhubarb pie dreams are especially bizarre.
:shock:

And as dreams bubble up from our unconscious, which probably taps into that whole body consciousness we aren't quite 'aware' of, I was wondering if anyone else found that they could indirectly influence dreams via the food they eat or actions they take during the day? I know whenever I do something I am ashamed of later, I'll hear about it in my dreams, one way or the other.
"I feel myself driven towards an end that I do not know. As soon as I shall have reached it, as soon as I shall become unnecessary, an atom will suffice to shatter me. Till then, not all the forces of mankind can do anything against me." - Napoleon Bonaparte
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Post by Clemsy » Wed Aug 04, 2010 10:03 pm

My rhubarb pie dreams are especially bizarre.
:lol:

Transom, you raise an interesting point. Dreams are, of course, a product of neural activity. Holistically speaking, diet affects all body systems, so Scrooge wasn't too far off when he speculated, "You may be an undigested bit of beef, a blot of mustard, a crumb of cheese, a fragment of an underdone potato. There's more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you are!" about Marley's ghost.

A parallel diet/dream log may be interesting!
Give me stories before I go mad! ~Andreas
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Post by Cindy B. » Wed Aug 04, 2010 10:43 pm

Often dreams are mere reflections of the day's mundane activities or bodily processes.

"My dear, Dr. Freud, sometimes a cigar is just a cigar." :P

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If the path before you is clear, you’re probably on someone else’s. --Jung
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Post by Transom » Thu Aug 05, 2010 2:06 pm

So I just had one of the worst nightmares of my life last night. Started a dream journal this morning. I'm at work and don't have a whole lot of time to browse the internet / find a GOOD source. Does anyone know off hand a good book or internet link to read about nightmares? I've read little enough about them. I'd like to read some more. And not so much the interpretation, just a study of nightmares.

Thanks,

Transom
"I feel myself driven towards an end that I do not know. As soon as I shall have reached it, as soon as I shall become unnecessary, an atom will suffice to shatter me. Till then, not all the forces of mankind can do anything against me." - Napoleon Bonaparte
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Post by Clemsy » Thu Aug 05, 2010 2:19 pm

I'm sure Cindy will have a good resource for you, Transom. Now that you're journaling, you'll find your dreams more accessible, for the most part.

Cheers,
Clemsy
Give me stories before I go mad! ~Andreas
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Post by jonsjourney » Thu Aug 05, 2010 2:58 pm

I am pretty certain that dream analysis is about journaling lots of dreams, seeking the patterns or connections, and then relating them to your individual experiences. A single dream can be meaningful, but the more pieces one has of the puzzle, the clearer the picture becomes.

I remember Jung referring to a patient in Psychology and Religion that they had recorded hundreds of the patients dreams! But Jung was a pretty extreme guy!
"He was a dreamer, a thinker, a speculative philosopher... or, as his wife would have it, an idiot." -Douglas Adams
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Clemsy
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Post by Clemsy » Thu Aug 05, 2010 3:12 pm

Patricia Garfield is a very good resource. I read her Creative Dreaming a couple years ago and enjoyed it very much. She's been recording her dreams, religiously for over 50 years!
Give me stories before I go mad! ~Andreas
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Post by creekmary » Wed Aug 18, 2010 11:30 am

I used to record my dreams more often. I recorded them to see how much of it came true. When I found a years old journal quite a while ago I was surprised. I had forgotten most of them and there was a lot of symbolism that made sense in hindsight. I think that's where most of my deja vu's used to come from. I think I am too focused on "the world" these days to pay attention to my own self though.

When I was younger I used to be able to change my dreams midstream. I can be aware of watching myself in dreams. I remember starting to have a nightmare once and thinking "oh wait! I'm dreaming. Screw this..." and changed the dream into something nicer.

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Post by Neoplato » Wed Aug 18, 2010 1:13 pm

When I was younger I used to be able to change my dreams midstream. I can be aware of watching myself in dreams. I remember starting to have a nightmare once and thinking "oh wait! I'm dreaming. Screw this..." and changed the dream into something nicer.
I've had many lucid dreams in the past, not so many recently. I've been able to "fall into a lucid dream" only twice, that's an interesting experience. :D

I also have dreams of being the "third person" watching either myself, or an event occur that I'm not a part of.

Unfortunately, I've never been able to stop a nightmare. Although, I do know how to wake myself up from one.
Infinite moment, grants freedom of winter death, allows life to dawn.
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Post by creekmary » Wed Aug 18, 2010 7:29 pm

how do you wake up? I haven't paid much attention to dreams at all for a long time, that's probably why I don't remember them unless they're intense. It might come in handy to know.

It's a good thing to learn though, how to get out of them or control them. Makes me wonder about subconscious communication if you can consciously change them though.

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Post by Neoplato » Wed Aug 18, 2010 7:39 pm

how do you wake up? I haven't paid much attention to dreams at all for a long time, that's probably why I don't remember them unless they're intense. It might come in handy to know. -Creekmary
I've been doing this since I was a child. What I usually do is close my eyes (in the dream) and say "wake up, wake up wake up" and I get a sensation of pulling upward into my body and opening my eyes.

I recognized that this is the same process (reversed) for "falling into a dream". Why this is more difficult for me, I have no clue.

Pulling up seems easy while "falling down" seems complicated. :?
Infinite moment, grants freedom of winter death, allows life to dawn.
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