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In the Company of Coyote
 

by Joanna Gardner

When I lived on a mesa in northern New Mexico, one summer night I left every window open so the starlit, indigo air could cool the house after a long, hot day. It seemed...

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This month’s theme is The Trickster. Enjoy our Weekly Offerings...

Featured Audio

I.6.3.03 - Celtic Influence and the Fairy Queen - an excerpt from this lecture.

Featured Video

The Goddess and the Madonna - Q&A

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Monthly Gift

Our gift to you this month is eSingle titled Dialogues – Excerpt from Mythic Worlds, Modern Words. Access this download for free until the end of the month.

This is an excerpt from Joseph Campbell’s collected and transcribed lectures Mythic Worlds, Modern Words: The Art of James Joyce.

Arranged by Joyce scholar Edmund L. Epstein, Mythic Worlds, Modern Words presents a wide range of Campbell’s writing and lectures on Joyce, which together form an illuminating running commentary on Joyce’s masterworks. Campbell’s visceral appreciation for all that was new in Joyce will delight the previously uninitiated, and perhaps intimidated, as well as longtime lovers of both Joyce and Campbell.

Dialogues is a Q+A portion where Campbell answers questions about James Joyce’s views on didactic art.

Got ideas? Share them with a community of like-minded mythmakers at our discussion forum – the Conversations of a Higher Order.

Joseph Campbell Book Club

“What happens when you pair an intelligent but selfish and crafty trickster with an embodiment of loyalty, compassion, and care? Get to know Loki and his wife, Sigyn, from the Norse mythological world in a fascinating dive into this unlikely coupling—Lea Svendsen’s Loki and Sigyn: Lessons on Chaos, Laughter & Loyalty from the Norse Gods. Svendsen approaches her subjects with vibrant storytelling, scholarly insights, a keen eye toward the tradition of heathenry, and always a healthy dose of humor as befits a trickster devotee. Please join me as we laugh at, learn from, and marvel at the lies and love of Loki.”

Scott Neumeister, PhD
Editorial Advisory Group
Joseph Campbell Foundation

Weekly Quotation

Almost all non-literate mythology has a trickster-hero of some kind. … And there’s a very special property in the trickster: he always breaks in, just as the unconscious does, to trip up the rational situation. He’s both a fool and someone who’s beyond the system. And the trickster represents all those possibilities of life that your mind hasn’t decided it wants to deal with. The mind structures a lifestyle, and the fool or trickster represents another whole range of possibilities. He doesn’t respect the values that you’ve set up for yourself, and smashes them.

-- Joseph Campbell
From An Open Life: Joseph Campbell in Conversation with Michael Toms